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  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 11/06/2024 at 2:00 PM (EST)

    Providing a truly inclusive play or park experience requires thoughtful planning and attention to ensure that site furnishings and amenities are more usable by more people, including those with disabilities, to the greatest extent possible. The placement or location of site furnishings and amenities and their operability is key to providing an inclusive play and park experience. Site amenities and design considerations within the built environment should be integrated throughout park destinations to support inclusive, intergenerational play and recreation. Scoping and technical guidelines for benches, picnic tables, grills, waste and recycling receptacles, picnic pavilions, drinking fountains/bottle fillers, telescopes, docks and piers, fitness equipment, toilet rooms, signage, and temporary events will all be addressed. This is the fourth session of a yearlong four-part Beyond the Minimums accessibility series. This webinar includes real-time captioning and video remote interpreting (VRI) upon request. To request video interpreting services and/or resources in an alternate format, please email core@playcore.com at least two weeks prior to the live webinar date.

    The Critical Role Accessible Site Amenities Play in Creating Outdoor Environments Where EveryBODY Feels Welcome

    Providing a truly inclusive play or park experience requires thoughtful planning and attention to ensure that site furnishings and amenities are more usable by more people, including those with disabilities, to the greatest extent possible. The placement or location of site furnishings and amenities and their operability is key to providing an inclusive play and park experience. Site amenities and design considerations within the built environment should be integrated throughout park destinations to support inclusive, intergenerational play and recreation.  Scoping and technical guidelines for benches, picnic tables, grills, waste and recycling receptacles, picnic pavilions, drinking fountains/bottle fillers, telescopes, docks and piers, fitness equipment, toilet rooms, signage, and temporary events will all be addressed. This is the fourth session of a yearlong four-part Beyond the Minimums accessibility series. This webinar includes real-time captioning and video remote interpreting (VRI) upon request. To request video interpreting services and/or resources in an alternate format, please email core@playcore.com at least two weeks prior to the live webinar date.

    1. Identify crucial elements that enhance inclusivity within play area and park design, recognizing how site furnishings and amenities can improve usability for diverse individuals.
    2. Outline effective strategies to integrate inclusive design considerations throughout park destinations, fostering intergenerational play and recreation experiences.
    3. List and provide explanations for technical guidelines about various site amenities, encompassing benches, picnic tables, grills, waste and recycling receptacles, picnic pavilions, drinking fountains/bottle fillers, telescopes, docks and piers, fitness equipment, toilet rooms, signage, and temporary events.
    4. Discuss the practical implementation of inclusive design principles, predicting and exploring the impact on park experiences. Engage in conversations about the challenges and solutions associated with creating genuinely inclusive play and recreation spaces.

    William (Bill) Botten

    Accessibility Consultant

    PlayCore

    Botten who currently works as an accessibility consultant joined the U.S. Access Board in 2000 and served for 22 years (retired in 2022) in several capacities while on staff including as a senior accessibility specialist, technical assistance coordinator, and the training coordinator. He was part of a team that developed the combined guidelines for the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Architectural Barriers Act and was the lead staff for the development of guidelines and technical assistance materials for the rulemaking on outdoor developed areas. Bill specializes in accessibility issues related to recreation facilities and outdoor developed areas.

    Jennie Sumrell (Moderator)

    CORE Community Outreach Director

    PlayCore

    Jennie worked in the field of childhood development and exceptional learning for nearly fifteen years. She has a Master’s degree in Special Education with a concentration in Early Childhood Education from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Jennie joined PlayCore in 2008 and serves as the Community Outreach Director within PlayCore’s Center for Outreach, Research and Education. Deeply passionate about inclusive, intergenerational play, Jennie utilizes her expertise and personal experiences as an educator to positively impact the development of innovative play and recreation destinations that focus on community health and wellness.

    This session will offer the following credits:

        

    image
            image
        image
    0.1 IACET CEU 
            1.0 AIA HSW LU 
        1.0 LA CES HSW PDH


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU / 1.0 AIA HSW LU / 1.0 LA CES HSW PDH) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


    CEUs can be applied toward NRPA CPRP/CPRE renewal. To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    The Americans with Disabilities Act requires state and local entities with over 50 employees to designate an ADA Coordinator to oversee and coordinate ADA compliance. This program meets the standards for training credits required by the ADA Coordinator Training Certification Program (ACTCP).

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions or to request a copy of the written transcript for this session, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 08/07/2024 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    Meeting the minimum accessibility design standards for play and recreation areas is the first step to ensuring everyone can participate, enjoy, and experience park and play area facilities. During the session, a panel of individuals with disabilities and professionals who support persons with disabilities will discuss features that can “make or break” play and recreational opportunities for individuals with autism, people with developmental disabilities, people with various sensory or communication needs, or individuals who are neurodivergent. Strategies, design elements, barriers, and accessibility will be discussed differently. We hope you will join us for this look beyond the minimum accessibility design standards to discover how your community can make your park and play areas more inclusive for everyone. This is the third session of a yearlong four-part Beyond the Minimums accessibility series. This webinar includes real-time captioning and video remote interpreting (VRI) upon request. To request video interpreting services and/or resources in an alternate format, please email core@playcore.com at least two weeks prior to the live webinar date.

    Disability Park Awareness Panel

    Meeting the minimum accessibility design standards for play and recreation areas is the first step to ensuring everyone can participate, enjoy, and experience park and play area facilities. During the session, a panel of individuals with disabilities and professionals who support persons with disabilities will discuss features that can “make or break” play and recreational opportunities for individuals with autism, people with developmental disabilities, people with various sensory or communication needs, or individuals who are neurodivergent. Strategies, design elements, barriers, and accessibility will be discussed differently. We hope you will join us for this look beyond the minimum accessibility design standards to discover how your community can make your park and play areas more inclusive for everyone. This is the third session of a yearlong four-part Beyond the Minimums accessibility series. This webinar includes real-time captioning and video remote interpreting (VRI) upon request. To request video interpreting services and/or resources in an alternate format, please email core@playcore.com at least two weeks prior to the live webinar date.

    1. Develop a statement of understanding that demonstrates the features that make a park or play area inclusive for everyone.
    2. Summarize the features and elements people with disabilities look for when choosing their recreational experiences.
    3. Evaluate existing park and play areas, and identify barriers that may restrict people with disabilities from being able to fully participate in the provided recreational opportunities.
    4. List two (2) helpful resources to obtain additional information or to utilize when evaluating new and existing park and play areas for inclusion.

    William (Bill) Botten

    Accessibility Consultant

    PlayCore

    Botten who currently works as an accessibility consultant joined the U.S. Access Board in 2000 and served for 22 years (retired in 2022) in several capacities while on staff including as a senior accessibility specialist, technical assistance coordinator, and the training coordinator. He was part of a team that developed the combined guidelines for the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Architectural Barriers Act and was the lead staff for the development of guidelines and technical assistance materials for the rulemaking on outdoor developed areas. Bill specializes in accessibility issues related to recreation facilities and outdoor developed areas.

    Jennie Sumrell (Moderator)

    CORE Community Outreach Director

    PlayCore

    Jennie worked in the field of childhood development and exceptional learning for nearly fifteen years. She has a Master’s degree in Special Education with a concentration in Early Childhood Education from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Jennie joined PlayCore in 2008 and serves as the Community Outreach Director within PlayCore’s Center for Outreach, Research and Education. Deeply passionate about inclusive, intergenerational play, Jennie utilizes her expertise and personal experiences as an educator to positively impact the development of innovative play and recreation destinations that focus on community health and wellness.

    This session will offer the following credits:

        

    image
            image
        image
    0.1 IACET CEU 
            1.0 AIA HSW LU 
        1.0 LA CES HSW PDH


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU / 1.0 AIA HSW LU / 1.0 LA CES HSW PDH) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


    CEUs can be applied toward NRPA CPRP/CPRE renewal. To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    The Americans with Disabilities Act requires state and local entities with over 50 employees to designate an ADA Coordinator to oversee and coordinate ADA compliance. This program meets the standards for training credits required by the ADA Coordinator Training Certification Program (ACTCP).

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions or to request a copy of the written transcript for this session, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 05/08/2024 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    People of all abilities should have access to the many health benefits aquatic play and recreation environments can offer. Well-designed aquatic facilities provide opportunities for rehabilitation, exercise, socialization, play, rest, and relaxation for community members across generations. It is critical to consider the needs of individuals with disabilities when planning, designing, and programming these environments. This session will review provisions in the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design that address independent access to swimming pools, water play destinations, splash parks, and spas. Accessibility Specialist, Bill Botten, will review the application of the requirements for aquatic facilities, as well as the scoping and technical requirements for pool lifts, sloped entries, transfer steps, transfer walls, and accessible stairs. Additionally, the session will provide suggestions to go beyond the minimum requirements to enhance inclusive aquatic recreation facilities, including lazy rivers, wave action pools, water play elements, and other site amenities to support the diverse needs of all visitors. This is the second session of a yearlong four-part Beyond the Minimums accessibility series. This webinar includes real-time captioning and video remote interpreting (VRI) upon request. To request video interpreting services and/or resources in an alternate format, please email core@playcore.com at least two weeks prior to the live webinar date.

    Splish Splash! Dive into Creating Accessible Aquatic Facilities

    People of all abilities should have access to the many health benefits aquatic play and recreation environments can offer. Well-designed aquatic facilities provide opportunities for rehabilitation, exercise, socialization, play, rest, and relaxation for community members across generations. It is critical to consider the needs of individuals with disabilities when planning, designing, and programming these environments. This session will review provisions in the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design that address independent access to swimming pools, water play destinations, splash parks, and spas. Accessibility Specialist, Bill Botten, will review the application of the requirements for aquatic facilities, as well as the scoping and technical requirements for pool lifts, sloped entries, transfer steps, transfer walls, and accessible stairs. Additionally, the session will provide suggestions to go beyond the minimum requirements to enhance inclusive aquatic recreation facilities, including lazy rivers, wave action pools, water play elements, and other site amenities to support the diverse needs of all visitors. This is the second session of a yearlong four-part Beyond the Minimums accessibility series. This webinar includes real-time captioning and video remote interpreting (VRI) upon request. To request video interpreting services and/or resources in an alternate format, please email core@playcore.com at least two weeks prior to the live webinar date.

    1. Identify the ADA Standards for Accessible Design minimum technical requirements that address independent access to newly constructed and altered aquatic facilities.
    2. Describe the application of accessibility requirements for an accessible means of entry for pool lifts, sloped entries, transfer steps, transfer walls, and accessible pool stairs.
    3. Discuss Strategies for Going Beyond Minimum accessibility Requirements that foster the creation of inclusive aquatic recreation spaces.
    4. Give examples of resources that include design enhancements for creating accessible aquatic facilities that support a diverse range of visitors.

    William (Bill) Botten

    Accessibility Consultant

    PlayCore

    Botten who currently works as an accessibility consultant joined the U.S. Access Board in 2000 and served for 22 years (retired in 2022) in several capacities while on staff including as a senior accessibility specialist, technical assistance coordinator, and the training coordinator. He was part of a team that developed the combined guidelines for the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Architectural Barriers Act and was the lead staff for the development of guidelines and technical assistance materials for the rulemaking on outdoor developed areas. Bill specializes in accessibility issues related to recreation facilities and outdoor developed areas.

    Jennie Sumrell (Moderator)

    CORE Community Outreach Director

    PlayCore

    Jennie worked in the field of childhood development and exceptional learning for nearly fifteen years. She has a Master’s degree in Special Education with a concentration in Early Childhood Education from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Jennie joined PlayCore in 2008 and serves as the Community Outreach Director within PlayCore’s Center for Outreach, Research and Education. Deeply passionate about inclusive, intergenerational play, Jennie utilizes her expertise and personal experiences as an educator to positively impact the development of innovative play and recreation destinations that focus on community health and wellness.

    This session will offer the following credits:

        

    image
            image
        image
    0.1 IACET CEU 
            1.0 AIA HSW LU 
        1.0 LA CES HSW PDH


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU / 1.0 AIA HSW LU / 1.0 LA CES HSW PDH) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


    CEUs can be applied toward NRPA CPRP/CPRE renewal. To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    The Americans with Disabilities Act requires state and local entities with over 50 employees to designate an ADA Coordinator to oversee and coordinate ADA compliance. This program meets the standards for training credits required by the ADA Coordinator Training Certification Program (ACTCP).

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions or to request a copy of the written transcript for this session, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/06/2024 at 2:00 PM (EST)

    Equitable and safe access to parks and recreation facilities begins with firm, stable, and slip-resistant ground surface materials along accessible, connecting routes. Thoughtful planning ensures people who use mobility devices or other adaptive equipment can move independently from site arrival points and throughout each park, play, and recreation setting. This session will address requirements for exterior routes and surfaces in outdoor recreational settings and offer design considerations to go beyond minimum compliance to make certain everyone has the ability to participate. Accessibility Specialist, Bill Botten, will review best practices for planning accessible routes, sidewalks, shared-use paths, routes to and within recreation facilities including play areas, sports fields, outdoor recreation areas, trails, and beaches. This is the first session of a yearlong four-part Beyond the Minimums accessibility series. This webinar includes real-time captioning and video remote interpreting (VRI) upon request. To request video interpreting services and/or resources in an alternate format, please email core@playcore.com at least two weeks prior to the live webinar date.

    Breaking Ground: Best Practices for Creating Accessible Routes and Surfacing in Parks and Recreation Facilities

    Equitable and safe access to parks and recreation facilities begins with firm, stable, and slip-resistant ground surface materials along accessible, connecting routes. Thoughtful planning ensures people who use mobility devices or other adaptive equipment can move independently from site arrival points and throughout each park, play, and recreation setting. This session will address requirements for exterior routes and surfaces in outdoor recreational settings and offer design considerations to go beyond minimum compliance to make certain everyone has the ability to participate. Accessibility Specialist, Bill Botten, will review best practices for planning accessible routes, sidewalks, shared-use paths, routes to and within recreation facilities including play areas, sports fields, outdoor recreation areas, trails, and beaches. This is the first session of a yearlong four-part Beyond the Minimums accessibility series. This webinar includes real-time captioning and video remote interpreting (VRI) upon request. To request video interpreting services and/or resources in an alternate format, please email core@playcore.com at least two weeks prior to the live webinar date. 

    1.  Describe the difference between accessible routes, sidewalks, pedestrian trails, circulation paths, and shared-use paths.
    2. Explain at least two scoping and technical requirements for routes to and within recreation facilities including play areas, sports fields, outdoor recreation areas, trails, and beaches.
    3. List three design considerations for accessible routes and surfaces that go beyond the minimum requirements of ADA to meet the needs of visitors of varying abilities.
    4. Name tools and resources to support the planning process and help professionals advocate for inclusive design solutions specific to routes and surfacing.

    William (Bill) Botten

    Accessibility Consultant

    PlayCore

    Botten who currently works as an accessibility consultant joined the U.S. Access Board in 2000 and served for 22 years (retired in 2022) in several capacities while on staff including as a senior accessibility specialist, technical assistance coordinator, and the training coordinator. He was part of a team that developed the combined guidelines for the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Architectural Barriers Act and was the lead staff for the development of guidelines and technical assistance materials for the rulemaking on outdoor developed areas. Bill specializes in accessibility issues related to recreation facilities and outdoor developed areas.

    Jennie Sumrell (Moderator)

    CORE Community Outreach Director

    PlayCore

    Jennie worked in the field of childhood development and exceptional learning for nearly fifteen years. She has a Master’s degree in Special Education with a concentration in Early Childhood Education from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Jennie joined PlayCore in 2008 and serves as the Community Outreach Director within PlayCore’s Center for Outreach, Research and Education. Deeply passionate about inclusive, intergenerational play, Jennie utilizes her expertise and personal experiences as an educator to positively impact the development of innovative play and recreation destinations that focus on community health and wellness.

    This session will offer the following credits:

        

    image       
            image             

      

             image


         image
         image
    0.1 IACET CEU
    1.0 AIA HSW LU 
        1.0 LA CES HSW PDH
    0.1 CEU1.25 Electives


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU / 1.0 AIA HSW LU / 1.0 LA CES HSW PDH / 0.1 CTRS / 1.25 ACTCP Elective) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


    CEUs can be applied toward NRPA CPRP/CPRE renewal and ACTCP certification. To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions or to request a copy of the written transcript for this session, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In August 2020, via the Great American Outdoors Act, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) permanently was funded at $900 million annually, offering funding opportunities for eligible projects to support land acquisition, recreational facility improvements and park planning projects. The National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers has developed a roadmap to help navigate the process, understand the requirements, and create a successful project application. Every project starts with a great idea! This session will provide a program overview, offer helpful tips to submit a standout application, and review a variety of resources to arm you for success!

    A Roadmap to Successfully Accessing Funding Through the Land and Water Conservation Fund

    In August 2020, via the Great American Outdoors Act, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) permanently was funded at $900 million annually, offering funding opportunities for eligible projects to support land acquisition, recreational facility improvements and park planning projects. The National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers has developed a roadmap to help navigate the process, understand the requirements, and create a successful project application. Every project starts with a great idea! This session will provide a program overview, offer helpful tips to submit a standout application, and review a variety of resources to arm you for success!

    1. Define what is LWCF and the eligibility requirements to receive funding.
    2. List five helpful tools/resources to assist in submitting a successful application.
    3. Outline the critical steps to the planning process, application submission, to post completion and sustainability of the project.
    4. Summarize a successful case example of a public outdoor recreation project funded through LWCF.

      Eric Feldbaum, CPRP

      Director of the Office of Community Recreation

      New Hampshire Division of Parks and Recreation within the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

      Eric has been with the Division for nine years and resides in Concord NH with his fiancé Rahkiya and dog Daisy.  While living in NH full time since 2011 he has been continuously exploring all the great recreational opportunities the state has to offer.


      He was finally able to land his dream job working for NH State Parks. One of his responsibilities is overseeing the Land and Water Conservation Fund for the State of New Hampshire as designated by the Governor. Since beginning this role Eric has awarded over $12 million to 40 NH local communities for acquisition and development of outdoor recreation.


      Eric’s passion for this program has led him to become an executive board member on the National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers (NASORLO), an organization whose primary role is to advocate for the state assistance program for the Land and Water Conservation Fund. As a result of his work at the national level in training and advocacy, he has been awarded the Service to NASORLO Award two consecutive years (2020 and 2021). Whether he is meeting with local communities or congressional members he continues to educate people about the Land and Water Conservation Fund and he is excited to share that with you today which he hopes will lead to you all submitting great grant applications.

      Antoinette Norfleet

      Grant Manager / Land and Water Conservation Fund Program

      Georgia Department of Natural Resources

      Antoinette was born and raised in the middle Tennessee area.  She received an accounting degree from Middle Tennessee State University and began her professional career with the Tennessee State Parks system as an accountant.  She later moved to Georgia and began working for Georgia State Parks within the Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

       

      She has held various positions within DNR, and currently serves as the Grants Program Manager and Alternate State Liaison Officer for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF).  She is responsible for selecting and awarding the LWCF grants as well as overseeing the compliance aspect after grant completion.  Some of her proudest career achievements include dispelling camping myths by introducing the first-time camper concept to management, being a part of the team that won the inaugural SCORP Excellence award in 2009 and being a board member of the National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers.

      Jennie Sumrell (Moderator)

      CORE Community Outreach Director

      PlayCore

      Jennie worked in the field of childhood development and exceptional learning for nearly fifteen years. She has a Master’s degree in Special Education with a concentration in Early Childhood Education from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Jennie joined PlayCore in 2008 and serves as the Community Outreach Director within PlayCore’s Center for Outreach, Research and Education. Deeply passionate about inclusive, intergenerational play, Jennie utilizes her expertise and personal experiences as an educator to positively impact the development of innovative play and recreation destinations that focus on community health and wellness.

      This session will offer the following credits:

          

      image
      0.1 IACET CEU 


      CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

      • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
      • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
      • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
      • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


      CEUs can be applied toward NRPA CPRP/CPRE renewal. To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

      Instructor(s) Disclosures:

      The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


      Speakers Disclosures:

      The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


      Notes:

      For any questions or to request a copy of the written transcript for this session, please contact core@playcore.com

    1. Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

      Meeting the minimum accessibility design standards for play and recreation areas is just the first step to making sure everyone can participate, enjoy, and experience park and play area facilities. During the session, a panel of persons with disabilities and professionals that support persons with disabilities will discuss features that can “make or break” the recreational opportunity for persons that are low-vision or blind, persons using mobility devices, persons who are hard of hearing or deaf, persons with developmental disabilities, and individuals that are neurodivergent. Strategies, design elements, barriers, and accessibility will be discussed from different viewpoints. We hope you will join us for this look beyond the minimum accessibility design standards to discover how you can make your park and play areas more inclusive for everyone. This webinar will include video remote interpreting (VRI) and real-time captioning. Participants may ask questions during the live session.

      Beyond the Minimums: Disability Park Awareness Webinar

      Meeting the minimum accessibility design standards for play and recreation areas is just the first step to making sure everyone can participate, enjoy, and experience park and play area facilities. During the session, a panel of persons with disabilities and professionals that support persons with disabilities will discuss features that can “make or break” the recreational opportunity for persons that are low-vision or blind, persons using mobility devices, persons who are hard of hearing or deaf, persons with developmental disabilities, and individuals that are neurodivergent. Strategies, design elements, barriers, and accessibility will be discussed from different viewpoints. We hope you will join us for this look beyond the minimum accessibility design standards to discover how your community can make your park and play areas more inclusive for everyone. This webinar includes video remote interpreting (VRI) and real-time captioning.


      1. Develop a statement of understanding that demonstrates the features that make a park or play area inclusive for everyone.
      2. Summarize the features and elements people with disabilities look for when choosing their recreational experiences.
      3. Evaluate existing park and play areas and identify barriers that may restrict people with disabilities from being able to fully participate in the provided recreational opportunities.
      4. List two (2) helpful resources to obtain additional information or to utilize when evaluating new and existing park and play areas.

      William (Bill) Botten

      Accessibility Consultant

      PlayCore

      Botten who currently works as an accessibility consultant joined the U.S. Access Board in 2000 and served for 22 years (retired in 2022) in several capacities while on staff including as a senior accessibility specialist, technical assistance coordinator, and the training coordinator. He was part of a team that developed the combined guidelines for the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Architectural Barriers Act and was the lead staff for the development of guidelines and technical assistance materials for the rulemaking on outdoor developed areas. Bill specializes in accessibility issues related to recreation facilities and outdoor developed areas.

      Jennie Sumrell

      CORE Community Outreach Director

      PlayCore

      Jennie worked in the field of childhood development and exceptional learning for nearly fifteen years. She has a Master’s degree in Special Education with a concentration in Early Childhood Education from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Jennie joined PlayCore in 2008 and serves as the Community Outreach Director within PlayCore’s Center for Outreach, Research and Education. Deeply passionate about inclusive, intergenerational play, Jennie utilizes her expertise and personal experiences as an educator to positively impact the development of innovative play and recreation destinations that focus on community health and wellness.

      Dr. Anjali J. Forber-Pratt

      Director

      ACL’s National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR)

      Dr. Forber-Pratt began her research career in 2006, and her primary area of expertise is disability identity development. Prior to joining ACL, she served as an assistant professor at Vanderbilt University. In addition to teaching courses and serving as a mentor to undergraduate students and thesis advisor for candidates for master’s and doctoral degrees, she served as principal investigator for research projects covering a range of disability issues, including training of special education teachers, experiences of students with disabilities at every education level, and identity development. She has authored 33 peer-reviewed journal articles and is the author or co-author of a number of textbook chapters.

      A two-time Paralympian and medalist in the sport of wheelchair racing, Dr. Forber-Pratt has dedicated her life to helping others recognize their potential. Globally, she is involved with disability advocacy efforts related to access to employment, education and sport. She was honored with the inaugural American Psychological Association Citizen Psychologist Award for Advancing Disability as a Human Rights and Social Justice Issue Award in 2020 and was recognized by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education as a 2018 Emerging Scholar. In 2013, she was awarded the American Association of People with Disabilities’ prestigious Paul G. Hearne Leadership Award, given to emerging leaders within the national disability community. Also in 2013, she was named a Champion of Change by the White House and had an opportunity to participate in a roundtable discussion with President Obama about disability policy issues.

      Marybeth Cleveland

      Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist

      A to B and Back, Orientation and Mobility Services, LLC

      Marybeth Cleveland created A to B and Back to provide Orientation and Mobility training to people with vision disabilities in Maryland, D.C. and Northern Virginia. She has been a Certified O&M Specialist for 30 years and is so passionate about accessibility in the environment, her whole family can point out areas of inaccessibility.  She became a member of the Pedestrian Bicycle Traffic Safety Advisory Committee (PBTSAC) and the Pedestrian Master plan committee in her home community of Montgomery County, MD.  She recently enjoyed being part of a project with the county to create a plan for making streets more accessible to people with visual disabilities.

      Ross Benjamin Edelstein

      Ph.D. candidate at Indiana University

      NCA Program at the Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands, a center of the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community

      Ross Edelstein (He/Him) is a research assistant at the NCA Program at the Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands, a center of the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community.  He is also a PhD student in Special Education at Indiana University.  Ross' work centers on helping improve the experiences of the neurodivergent community in cultural spaces, such as parks, museums, and other spaces, and combines the research and practical knowledge he has gained to do so.  Ross is also Autistic, and his lived experience has proved to be a valuable asset.  He has recently been awarded the Emerging Leaders award by the Kennedy Center's Office of VSA and Accessibility for this work.

      Chris Haulmark

      Vice President - Board of Directors CHAIR - Social Justice Committee

      Kansas Association of the Deaf

      Chris Haulmark is a passionate Deaf advocate with vast experience in backpacking, politics, and community involvement. Having traveled across the world, he has visited many Deaf families and gained cultural insights that he utilizes to promote Deaf culture. As a former congressional campaign candidate who transitioned to a state legislature race, Chris has extensive political knowledge and skills, including networking, community building, and relationship management with community leaders. Currently volunteering for the Museum of Deaf History, Art, and Culture, Chris is dedicated to preserving and promoting Deaf culture. Additionally, as the Vice President for the Kansas Association for the Deaf, Chris is active in advancing Deaf rights and inclusion at the state level. With his unique combination of travel, political, and community involvement, Chris’s commitment to fostering understanding and representation for the Deaf community is unwavering.

      Susan Potts

      Therapeutic Recreation & Accommodation Services Manager

      Howard County, MD Dept. of Recreation and Parks

      Susan Potts, MS, CTRS is the Therapeutic Recreation and Inclusion Services Manager for Howard County Maryland, Department of Recreation and Parks since  2007. Susan manages the Therapeutic Recreation and Accommodation Services that supports for individuals with disabilities. Susan received a Governor’s Citation in 2018 in recognition for her work with individuals with disabilities, as well as Leadership Awards for work in the area accessibility from the Howard County Autism Society and Howard County Commission on Disability and Access.
      Susan received a Bachelor of Science degree, in Recreation with an emphasis in Therapeutic Recreation from Southeast Missouri State University 1992 and a Master of Science degree in Recreation Administration from George Williams College of Aurora University (AU). Susan is a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist, (CTRS) and has been since 1993. She also is an instructor in Nonviolent Crisis Intervention

      This session will offer the following credits:

          

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      0.1 IACET CEU 


      CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

      • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
      • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
      • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
      • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


      CEUs can be applied toward NRPA CPRP/CPRE renewal. To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

      Instructor(s) Disclosures:

      The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


      Speakers Disclosures:

      The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


      Notes:

      If you do not have sound capabilities on your computer or prefer to listen by phone, please refer to the email reminder that you received which listed various telephone options. 

      For any questions or to request a copy of the written transcript for this session, please contact core@playcore.com

    2. Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/22/2023

      The Advocating for Maintenance to Upper Management session will offer play facility owners and administrators information on the needs and benefits of these spaces. In addition, financial consequences of poorly maintained areas, and duties to manage and operate the facility to the highest safety levels will be covered. Special attention will be given to the role of the agency management to establish a proactive inspection, maintenance, and repair philosophy throughout the agency/department. During the session, we will discuss the key points of a written policy and procedures document to manage public play areas, the importance of hiring qualified inspectors and maintenance technicians to implement the policy, and the importance of continuously training staff.

      Making Playground Safety and Management a Top Priority Series

      Putting Your Plan into Action

      While the needs and benefits of maintaining play spaces are important, so is understating how to create a plan and implement it. The Putting Your Plan into Action session will share information on the role and general responsibilities of the individual(s) (e.g., Playground Safety Program Coordinator) who would conduct routine visual inspections of play areas, operational and annual inspections, post-installation compliance and assessment, and hazard analysis and benefit-risk assessment of playground layout and design. Identifying the knowledge and competency required for these various subjects required for each type of playground inspection will be shared during the session. Most importantly, the underlying philosophy for conducting routine playground inspections will be discussed..


      1. Identify at least three (3) Playground Safety Program Coordinator responsibilities.
      2. Recognize the main objective of each type of playground inspection.
      3. Outline the depth of knowledge required in each type of playground inspection and the underlying philosophy for conducting a routine inspection.
      4. Identify at least two (2) training resources available to train the owner’s inspectors.

      Ken Kustka

      Executive Director

      International Playground Safety Institute, LLC

      Ken Kutska is one of a few individuals who has been involved since the 1970s in the evolution of the public playground industry safety standards, he was co-founder and instructor of the National Recreation and Park Association's (NRPA) National Playground Safety Institute and its internationally recognized Certified Playground Safety Inspector Program. He is also an instructor for the 2-day Playground Maintenance Technician course which offers a Certificate of Completion through Clemson University. He continues to promote safe, challenging public play spaces for all people as a member of the advisory board for the International Playground Equipment Manufacturers Association (IPEMA) Voice of Play, as a founding member of the U.S. Play Coalition, an NRPA Past President and member of their Ambassador Committee, and Chair of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F15.29 Subcommittee on performance requirements for public play equipment. Lastly, he is the Co-Chair of ASTM Working Group which created the ASTM F3101-15 Standard Specification for Unsupervised Public Use Outdoor Fitness Equipment.

      Lloyd Reese

      Vice President Technical Product Management

      PlayCore

      Lloyd Reese has 30 years of experience in the ideation and development of products serving the play and recreation market. He actively serves on numerous ASTM, CSA, and ISO play related committees and is currently vice chair of ASTM F08.63 Playground surfacing systems. Lloyd is also a founding member of IPEMA and is currently serving his second term as president of that organization, in addition to chairing the IPEMA surfacing certification program and serving on the equipment certification committee.

      This session will offer the following credits:

          

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      0.1 IACET CEU 


      CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

      • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
      • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
      • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
      • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


      CEUs can be applied toward NRPA CPRP/CPRE renewal. To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

      Instructor(s) Disclosures:

      The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


      Speakers Disclosures:

      The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


      Notes:

      For any questions or to request a copy of the written transcript for this session, please contact core@playcore.com

    3. Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/27/2023

      The Advocating for Maintenance to Upper Management session will offer play facility owners and administrators information on the needs and benefits of these spaces. In addition, financial consequences of poorly maintained areas, and duties to manage and operate the facility to the highest safety levels will be covered. Special attention will be given to the role of the agency management to establish a proactive inspection, maintenance, and repair philosophy throughout the agency/department. During the session, we will discuss the key points of a written policy and procedures document to manage public play areas, the importance of hiring qualified inspectors and maintenance technicians to implement the policy, and the importance of continuously training staff.

      Making Playground Safety and Management a Top Priority Series

      Advocating for Maintenance to Upper Management Levels


      The Advocating for Maintenance to Upper Management session will offer play facility owners and administrators information on the needs and benefits of these spaces. In addition, financial consequences of poorly maintained areas, and duties to manage and operate the facility to the highest safety levels will be covered. Special attention will be given to the role of the agency management to establish a proactive inspection, maintenance, and repair philosophy throughout the agency/department. During the session, we will discuss the key points of a written policy and procedures document to manage public play areas, the importance of hiring qualified inspectors and maintenance technicians to implement the policy, and the importance of continuously training staff.


      1. List at least two (2) needs and benefits of play and playgrounds and their maintenance.
      2. Identify and describe at least three (3) problems and their corresponding financial consequences that may arise from neglecting routine inspection and maintenance of the play and recreation area.
      3. Develop a comprehensive strategy that includes specific steps and timelines for hiring and training qualified inspectors and maintenance technicians to effectively manage and maintain the play and recreation area.
      4. Explain the significance of having a written playground management policy that is endorsed and supported by the owners' policymakers and top-down management and identify at least three (3) benefits that can result from such a policy.

      Ken Kustka

      Executive Director

      International Playground Safety Institute, LLC

      Ken Kutska is one of a few individuals who has been involved since the 1970s in the evolution of the public playground industry safety standards, he was co-founder and instructor of the National Recreation and Park Association's (NRPA) National Playground Safety Institute and its internationally recognized Certified Playground Safety Inspector Program. He is also an instructor for the 2-day Playground Maintenance Technician course which offers a Certificate of Completion through Clemson University. He continues to promote safe, challenging public play spaces for all people as a member of the advisory board for the International Playground Equipment Manufacturers Association (IPEMA) Voice of Play, as a founding member of the U.S. Play Coalition, an NRPA Past President and member of their Ambassador Committee, and Chair of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F15.29 Subcommittee on performance requirements for public play equipment. Lastly, he is the Co-Chair of ASTM Working Group which created the ASTM F3101-15 Standard Specification for Unsupervised Public Use Outdoor Fitness Equipment.

      Lloyd Reese

      Vice President Technical Product Management

      PlayCore

      Lloyd Reese has 30 years of experience in the ideation and development of products serving the play and recreation market. He actively serves on numerous ASTM, CSA, and ISO play related committees and is currently vice chair of ASTM F08.63 Playground surfacing systems. Lloyd is also a founding member of IPEMA and is currently serving his second term as president of that organization, in addition to chairing the IPEMA surfacing certification program and serving on the equipment certification committee.

      This session will offer the following credits:

          

      image
      0.1 IACET CEU 


      CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

      • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
      • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
      • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
      • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


      CEUs can be applied toward NRPA CPRP/CPRE renewal. To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

      Instructor(s) Disclosures:

      The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


      Speakers Disclosures:

      The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


      Notes:

      For any questions or to request a copy of the written transcript for this session, please contact core@playcore.com

    4. Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

      Choosing a compliant playground surfacing under and around playground equipment is one of the most important factors in reducing the likelihood of injuries. Strong Foundations explores the features and benefits of various surfacing options in outdoor play, addresses current standards and criteria, and highlights case examples that will inspire ways to add additional play value to your parks and playgrounds. The session will review a step-by-step process and discuss considerations when selecting, purchasing, installing, and maintaining your safety surface.

      Choosing a compliant playground surfacing under and around playground equipment is one of the most important factors in reducing the likelihood of injuries. Strong Foundations explores the features and benefits of various surfacing options in outdoor play, addresses current standards and criteria, and highlights case examples that will inspire ways to add additional play value to your parks and playgrounds. The session will review a step-by-step process and discuss considerations when selecting, purchasing, installing, and maintaining your safety surface.


      Learning Objectives

      1. Describe the features and benefits of various surfacing options and how impact absorbing, accessible surfacing can be the most important factor in reducing the likelihood of life-threatening injuries on playgrounds.
      2. Outline best practices, considerations, and strategies when planning, purchasing, and protecting your surfacing investment.
      3. Summarize how surfacing can be utilized to increase the overall play value and experiences for children, families, and communities in local parks.
      4. Utilize standards, criteria, inspection tools, and other resources to assist with the evaluation, selection, and other processes involved in safety surfacing.

      Lloyd Reese

      Vice President Technical Product Management

      PlayCore

      Lloyd Reese has 30 years of experience in the ideation and development of products serving the play and recreation market. He actively serves on numerous ASTM, CSA, and ISO play related committees and is currently vice chair of ASTM F08.63 Playground surfacing systems. Lloyd is also a founding member of IPEMA and is currently serving his second term as president of that organization, in addition to chairing the IPEMA surfacing certification program and serving on the equipment certification committee.

      Karim Odeh

      Sales Manager

      PlayCore/Surfacing Group

      Karim Odeh is a Regional Sales Manager for PlayCore's surfacing division. He has been in the recreation industry for over 4 years and is a Certified Instructor for PlayCore's Center for Outreach, Research, and Education, focusing on the Strong Foundations program. He received his Bachelor's degree from Tennessee Technological University in International Business and Cultures.

      Juan Barajas

      Parks Superintendent

      City of Fremont / Fremont, CA

      Inés Palacios, PhD (Moderator)

      Training & Professional Development Manager

      PlayCore / CORE

      Dr. Palacios is responsible for promoting the value of recreation for people of all ages and abilities. She provides training, continuing educational opportunities, professional development, and research that supports recreation and play while generating partnerships and alliances in the field. She joined the PlayCore team in 2013 after obtaining a PhD in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism from NC State University. Before joining PlayCore, she was an instructor at NC State University in the Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management Department. She is currently serving as NRPA's Chair of the Conference Program Committee and as a member of the Board of Directors for Dix Park Conservancy. Inés is based out of Raleigh, NC.

      This session will offer the following credits:

           

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      image  
      image
      0.1 IACET CEU /
       1.0 AIA HSW LU /  1.0 LA CES HSW PDH


      CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU / 1.0 AIA HSW LU / 1.0 LA CES HSW PDH) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

      • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
      • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
      • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
      • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


      To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

      Instructor(s) Disclosures:

      The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    5. Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

      Inequitable access to nature, parks, and recreation has been long standing across the globe with direct and indirectly disproportionate impacts on various people - the culturally and linguistically diverse; indigenous, black, and brown communities; low socio-economic communities; the aged and women; casual workforce status communities; and LGBTQ+. COVID-19 not only highlighted but also accelerated these inequities, resulting in heightened demands for equitable access to quality public parks and recreation. International speakers in this session will focus on how you can use data to understand the inequities in your park and recreation system and explore strategies for addressing equitable access to quality parks and the equitable provision of recreation programs and facilities.

      Inequitable access to nature, parks, and recreation has been long standing across the globe with direct and indirectly disproportionate impacts on various people - the culturally and linguistically diverse; indigenous, black, and brown communities; low socio-economic communities; the aged and women; casual workforce status communities; and LGBTQ+. COVID-19 not only highlighted but also accelerated these inequities, resulting in heightened demands for equitable access to quality public parks and recreation. International speakers in this session will focus on how you can use data to understand the inequities in your park and recreation system and explore strategies for addressing equitable access to quality parks and the equitable provision of recreation programs and facilities.


      Learning Objectives

      • Understand how to use data to quantify and understand park and recreation system inequities
      • Understand how data can be integrated into all aspects of decision making for equitable access to parks and recreation system services
      • Understand how to use data to equitably schedule park maintenance and asset replacement schedules
      • Understand how to use data to equitably address recreation program and facility service needs and allocate staff and funds

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                          image

      Jayne Miller, CPRP

      Chair, World Urban Parks

      CEO, Jayne Miller Consulting

      Jayne Miller is an internationally recognized parks & recreation leader bringing forward innovative approaches in service delivery and community impacts. Her work is especially focused in the urban parks arena advancing park system equitable investment action plans, racial equity action plans, showcasing the work of emerging leaders, and governance, leadership and management best practices.

      Jasneet Bains, MPH, MURP

      Associate Program Manager

      Prevention Institute

      Jasneet Bains focuses on healthy, equitable land use planning, park equity, transportation justice, and equitable public infrastructure investments through research, technical assistance/training, and policy advocacy. Jasneet lead development of PI’s Park Equity, Life Expectancy, and Power Building Toolkit, which shows research linking parks/green space to life expectancy to support equitable investments in park infrastructure in disinvested communities.

      Will Klein

      Project Manager for Parks Research

      The Trust for Public Land

      Will is the Project Manager for Parks Research and a member of TPL’s Land and People Lab. He leads TPL’s place-based and national park research projects, focusing on the role of social access to parks as a complement to physical access and the next generation of park data tools. Will also directs and manages TPL’s ParkScore index, an annual ranking of the park systems of the 100 largest US cities. In this role he is responsible for the design and development of technology systems for managing park data and provides research, analysis, and recommendations for improving parks, trails, and open space for park agencies and affiliated organizations. Will received a Master’s degree in Environmental Management with a specialty in Urban Social Ecology from Yale University.

      Vanessa Knoppke-Wetzel

      Associate Director

      GreenInfo Network

      Vanessa Knoppke-Wetzel (she/her) is the Associate Director at GreenInfor Network. She has worked in the federal government, non-profits, tech industry, and higher education. She currently is a Director at Large for the North American Cartographic Information Society (NACIS), where she chairs the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee; an Alumni Mentor for UW-Madison's SuccessWorks; and the 2022 DC Meet Director for Pull for Pride. She also is the founder of #creativeCarto, and one half of URhere podcast.

      Vanessa is a detail-oriented cartographer, designer, analyst, educator, and community-builder that loves thinking about how to create and design products and utilize spatial data to tell visual stories in the best way possible. She also cares a lot about cultivating, building, and growing community (anywhere), which has led to her dedicating a lot of her free time in the last decade to giving talks, hosting workshops, and volunteering in the spatial world. She firmly believes everyone can become a better analyst, designer, and storyteller - even if they never have been in the spatial industry.

      She also does non-mappy things: you can find her lifting weights, running, or enjoying the outdoors when not doing the above.

      Russ Carson, PhD

      Research & Community Impact Strategist

      PlayCore

      Russ has over 20 years of experience as a university Professor in kinesiology and public health, applied researcher, and PlayCore scholar and author of PlayOn! Russ is a passionate speaker on topics of comprehensive health and wellness and a committed champion of research translation and application. He is currently PlayCore’s Research & Community Impact Strategist dedicated to helping professionals turn research into practice for community health impact. Russ lives, works, and plays in northern Colorado.

      Inés Palacios, PhD (Moderator)

      Training & Professional Development Manager

      PlayCore / CORE

      Dr. Palacios is responsible for promoting the value of recreation for people of all ages and abilities. She provides training, continuing educational opportunities, professional development, and research that supports recreation and play while generating partnerships and alliances in the field. She joined the PlayCore team in 2013 after obtaining a PhD in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism from NC State University. Before joining PlayCore, she was an instructor at NC State University in the Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management Department. She is currently serving as NRPA's Chair of the Conference Program Committee and as a member of the Board of Directors for Dix Park Conservancy. Inés is based out of Raleigh, NC.

      This session will offer the following credits:

           

      image
      0.1 IACET CEU



      CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

      • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
      • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
      • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
      • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


      To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

      Instructor(s) Disclosures:

      The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


      Speakers Disclosures:

      The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


      Notes:

      For any questions or to request a copy of the written transcript for this session, please contact core@playcore.com