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  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 02/21/2023 at 2:00 PM (EST)

    Every human, in fact all mammals, have within them a biological wiring to play. Play circuits, in our brains at birth, are activated by stimulating elements in our environment. When a ball, a puppy, or a fun friend activates our play circuits, we feel an urge to turn our attention to that stimulus and engage with it – toss the ball, pet the puppy, or joke with the friend. Each of us possesses a play nature that is a unique combination of play personality types; identify the personality types that are playful for you, and you will have less stress and more happiness in your life. The wiring of those circuits is unique to each of us and that contributes to our each having a unique mix of play personality characteristics. Public spaces can and should be designed with play in mind if we are to truly create a healthier, happier society.

    Every human, in fact all mammals, have within them a biological wiring to play. Play circuits, in our brains at birth, are activated by stimulating elements in our environment. When a ball, a puppy, or a fun friend activates our play circuits, we feel an urge to turn our attention to that stimulus and engage with it – toss the ball, pet the puppy, or joke with the friend. Each of us possesses a play nature that is a unique combination of play personality types; identify the personality types that are playful for you, and you will have less stress and more happiness in your life. The wiring of those circuits is unique to each of us and that contributes to our each having a unique mix of play personality characteristics. Public spaces can and should be designed with play in mind if we are to truly create a healthier, happier society.


    Learning Objectives:

    1. Summarize how our drive to play is as integral to our biology as our drive to eat or sleep.
    2. List three reasons why play is critical for children to grow into capable adults.
    3. Outline design strategies that align with various play personalities and create less stress and more happiness.
    4. Describe at least one case examples of how play was intentionally designed into a public space outside of the traditional playground environment.

    Dr. Stuart Brown

    Founder & President

    National Institute of Play

    As a like-minded play advocate, PlayCore is proud to partner with Dr. Stuart Brown on furthering the advancement of play and helping our world understand the critical importance of participating in play throughout life. Our work together thus far has resulted in several play concepts that promote attunement between family members, and we are honored to feature Dr. Brown as our Scholarly Writer in Residence, a role in which he will impart his wealth of knowledge through seminars, features, and a monthly blog.

    Tom Norquist

    Senior Vice President of Innovation & Business Development

    PlayCore

    As a founding board member in 1995, past president, past treasurer, current secretary and president elect of the International Play Equipment Manufacturer’s Association (IPEMA) and long-term active American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) representative, over the past 34 years, Tom has been involved in all aspects of the play industry. He served from 2002-2004 on the Advisory Board for the National Program for Playground Safety (NPPS). He served from 2002-2004 on the Advisory Board for the National Program for Playground Safety (NPPS).


    For over a decade, he actively served in the (Access Board) Recreation Access Advisory Committee and Regulatory Negotiation meetings and additionally served on the advisory panel for the Access Board’s on-line Technical Assistance and Training for Play Area Accessibility. Tom served for over 15 years on the Board for the International Playground Contractor’s Association (NPCAI), and is a founding steering committee member and active leader on the U.S. Coalition for Play. Tom is one of few recipients of the coveted Joe L. Frost Play Research Collection National Play Advocate Award in April 2008.


    Additionally, over the past five years, Tom has led Dr. Stuart Brown’s National Institute for Play (NIFP) Board and is the project co-leader of the first known on-line database of scientific and academic research creating a cohesive picture about the proven scientific benefits of play. Tom received Auburn University’s School of Industrial and Graphic Design Distinguished Service Award for his leadership teaching ten design studios over the past twelve years. Finally, Tom serves on the Canadian Standards Association Children’s Playspaces & Equipment Z614 committee and is representing the United States on the ISO TC83 Playground Equipment committee.


    Tom is a passionate play advocate and enjoys the many fun opportunities he has created at his “Boneyard” to play outdoors with family and friends of all ages.

    Inés Palacios, PhD (Moderator)

    Training & Professional Development Manager

    PlayCore / CORE

    Inés is responsible for promoting the value of recreation for people of all ages and abilities. She provides continuing educational opportunities, professional development, and research that supports recreation and play while generating partnerships and alliances in the field. She joined the PlayCore team in August 2013 after obtaining her PhD in Parks, Recreation and Tourism from NC State University. Before joining PlayCore, she was an instructor at NC State University in the Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management Department. In addition, she has experience in event planning, program management, research, and national presentations. Inés is based out of Raleigh, NC.

    This session will offer the following credits:

         

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    image  
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    0.1 IACET CEU /
     1.0 AIA HSW LU /  1.0 LA CES HSW PDH


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU / 1.0 AIA HSW LU / 1.0 LA CES HSW PDH) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions or to request a copy of the written transcript for this session, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Learning objectives: Summarize the LWCF funding expectations after being awarded and for long term sustainability and compliance; List important considerations to take as you prepare for the completion of your project; Summarize a community case example that used LWCF funding to deploy evidence-based best practices to support health and wellness; List three helpful resources to assist in project completion, celebration, and sustainability.

    A Roadmap to Successfully Accessing Funding through the Land & Water, Conservation Fund (LWCF)

    Celebrating Your Community’s LWCF Award & Completion

    In August of 2020, via the Great American Outdoor Act, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) was permanently funded at $900 million annually, offering funding opportunities for eligible projects to support land acquisition, recreational facility improvements and park planning projects. The National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers (NASORLO) have developed a roadmap and a variety of resources to help you navigate the requirements and outline the process for submitting a standout project application for your state’s LWCF State Assistance Program. Every project starts with a great idea!  Case examples will offer a step-by-step roadmap through the planning process, project completion, and sustainability phases and arm you for success.


    Learning Objectives

    • Summarize the LWCF funding expectations after being awarded and for long term sustainability and compliance.
    • List important considerations to take as you prepare for the completion of your project.
    • Summarize a community case example that used LWCF funding to deploy evidence-based best practices to support health and wellness.
    • List three helpful resources to assist in project completion, celebration, and sustainability.

    Antoinette Norfleet

    Grant Manager / Land and Water Conservation Fund Program

    Georgia Department of Natural Resources

    Antoinette was born and raised in the middle Tennessee area.  She received an accounting degree from Middle Tennessee State University and began her professional career with the Tennessee State Parks system as an accountant.  She later moved to Georgia and began working for Georgia State Parks within the Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

     

    She has held various positions within DNR, and currently serves as the Grants Program Manager and Alternate State Liaison Officer for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF).  She is responsible for selecting and awarding the LWCF grants as well as overseeing the compliance aspect after grant completion.  Some of her proudest career achievements include dispelling camping myths by introducing the first-time camper concept to management, being a part of the team that won the inaugural SCORP Excellence award in 2009 and being a board member of the National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers.

    Vonda Martin

    Park Planner / Greensboro Parks and Recreation

    City of Greensboro

    Vonda Martin currently serves as the Park Planner for the City of Greensboro. Collectively, Vonda has 30+ years of experience in the field of Parks and Recreation. Over the years, she has worked in the corporate, non-profit, private, and public sectors. This includes time served as a consultant with North Carolina State University’s (NCSU’s) Recreation Resources Service and Director of the Armfield Civic and Recreation Center in Pilot Mountain, NC. Vonda obtained her Bachelor’s degree in Recreation from Catawba College and a Master of Science in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management from NCSU. She is active in the profession as the co-founder of the Women’s LeadHERship Workshop, an advisory committee member of Haw River State Park, a member of NRPA, NCRPA, and Friends of Mountain-To-Sea Trail. She is the first practitioner to be a chapter author, Physical Resource and Environmental Planning for the Management of Parks and Recreation Agencies – 5th Edition, sponsored by the Commission for Accreditation of Parks and Recreation Agencies (CAPRA) with Brie Hensold.  She is has a passion for improving outdoor recreational opportunities for all, is married to Dale Smith and they live in Chapel Hill.

    Shawna Tillery

    Planning and Project Development Division Manager / Greensboro Parks and Recreation

    City of Greensboro

    Shawna currently serves as the Planning and Project Development Division Manager from the City of Greensboro Parks and Recreation Department. In this role, she manage the departmental efforts in the areas of strategic and long-range planning, Capital Improvement Program, Capital Life Cycle Plan, and recreational bond referendums with regards to open space, greenways, trails, parkland and facilities

    Shawna completed her undergraduate degree at the University of NC at Wilmington majoring in Political Science with minors in Spanish and International Affairs. Shawna moved to Greensboro a year after completing her undergraduate degree to complete a Masters in Public Affairs at the University of NC at Greensboro.  

    Inés Palacios, PhD (Moderator)

    Training & Professional Development Manager

    PlayCore / CORE

    Inés is responsible for promoting the value of recreation for people of all ages and abilities. She provides continuing educational opportunities, professional development, and research that supports recreation and play while generating partnerships and alliances in the field. She joined the PlayCore team in August 2013 after obtaining her PhD in Parks, Recreation and Tourism from NC State University. Before joining PlayCore, she was an instructor at NC State University in the Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management Department. In addition, she has experience in event planning, program management, research, and national presentations. Inés is based out of Raleigh, NC.

    This session will offer the following credits:   

    image

    0.1 IACET CEU


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Disclosure:

    PlayCore discloses an interest in attendees partnering with our brands on their play and recreation initiatives.

    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Learning objectives: Define the critical steps of planning and developing a LWCF project; Outline the steps to creating and managing a project timeline; Summarize a successful case example of a public outdoor recreation project funded through LWCF; List three helpful tips/resources to assist in submitting a successful application.

    A Roadmap to Successfully Accessing Funding through the Land & Water, Conservation Fund (LWCF)

    Concept to Application: Explore a LWCF Project Case Example

    In August of 2020, via the Great American Outdoor Act, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) was permanently funded at $900 million annually, offering funding opportunities for eligible projects to support land acquisition, recreational facility improvements and park planning projects. The National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers (NASORLO) have developed a roadmap and a variety of resources to help you navigate the requirements and outline the process for submitting a standout project application for your state’s LWCF State Assistance Program. Every project starts with a great idea!  Case examples will offer a step-by-step roadmap through the planning process, project completion, and sustainability phases and arm you for success.

    Learning Objectives

    • Define the critical steps of planning and developing a LWCF project.
    • Outline the steps to creating and managing a project timeline.
    • Summarize a successful case example of a public outdoor recreation project funded through LWCF.
    • List three helpful tips/resources to assist in submitting a successful application.


    Andy Bohannon, CPRP, AFO

    Parks, Recreation and Facilities Director

    Keene, NH

    Andy Bohannon, CPRP, AFO is Parks, Recreation and Facilities Director for the City of Keene, NH. A native of son, Andy grew up in Wheelock Park attending the parks and recreation programs. He began working for the City in 1987 as a youth basketball official, and then worked at the pools, playground program, and as a building supervisor though his college years at Keene State.


    Since joining the city on a professional level in 2004, he has increased program offerings, established master plans, created pocket parks, improved the trail system, and created sponsorship opportunities, promoted Keene as a great place to work, stay and play. In 2005, he piloted the CATCH program for the Foundation for Healthy Communities and the success of the program spread to over 100 communities around the state. His work with a local coalition called Advocates for Healthy Youth led to his selection as a recipient of the inaugural President’s Council and Sports Community Leadership Award in 2007. In 2018 he received the NH Recreation and Parks distinguished WINK Tapply Professional Award for his service to the association.  

    Eric Feldbaum, CPRP

    Director of the Office of Community Recreation

    New Hampshire Division of Parks and Recreation within the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

    Eric has been with the Division for nine years and resides in Concord NH with his fiancé Rahkiya and dog Daisy.  While living in NH full time since 2011 he has been continuously exploring all the great recreational opportunities the state has to offer.


    He was finally able to land his dream job working for NH State Parks. One of his responsibilities is overseeing the Land and Water Conservation Fund for the State of New Hampshire as designated by the Governor. Since beginning this role Eric has awarded over $12 million to 40 NH local communities for acquisition and development of outdoor recreation.


    Eric’s passion for this program has led him to become an executive board member on the National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers (NASORLO), an organization whose primary role is to advocate for the state assistance program for the Land and Water Conservation Fund. As a result of his work at the national level in training and advocacy, he has been awarded the Service to NASORLO Award two consecutive years (2020 and 2021). Whether he is meeting with local communities or congressional members he continues to educate people about the Land and Water Conservation Fund and he is excited to share that with you today which he hopes will lead to you all submitting great grant applications.

    Inés Palacios, PhD (Moderator)

    Training & Professional Development Manager

    PlayCore / CORE

    Inés is responsible for promoting the value of recreation for people of all ages and abilities. She provides continuing educational opportunities, professional development, and research that supports recreation and play while generating partnerships and alliances in the field. She joined the PlayCore team in August 2013 after obtaining her PhD in Parks, Recreation and Tourism from NC State University. Before joining PlayCore, she was an instructor at NC State University in the Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management Department. In addition, she has experience in event planning, program management, research, and national presentations. Inés is based out of Raleigh, NC.

    This session will offer the following credits:   

    image

    0.1 IACET CEU


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Disclosure:

    PlayCore discloses an interest in attendees partnering with our brands on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Learning objectives: Summarize the goals of the LWCF State Assistance Program; Outline the eligibility requirements to receive LWCF funding for a public outdoor recreation project; Define what is a SCORP and how to align with state specific requirements; List three tips/resources to assist in the planning process.

    A Roadmap to Successfully Accessing Funding through the Land & Water, Conservation Fund (LWCF)

    LWCF 101: Program Overview & Helpful Tips to Get Started

    In August of 2020, via the Great American Outdoor Act, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) was permanently funded at $900 million annually, offering funding opportunities for eligible projects to support land acquisition, recreational facility improvements and park planning projects. The National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers (NASORLO) have developed a roadmap and a variety of resources to help you navigate the requirements and outline the process for submitting a standout project application for your state’s LWCF State Assistance Program. Every project starts with a great idea!  Case examples will offer a step-by-step roadmap through the planning process, project completion, and sustainability phases and arm you for success.

    Learning Objectives

    • Summarize the goals of the LWCF State Assistance Program.
    • Outline the eligibility requirements to receive LWCF funding for a public outdoor recreation project.
    • Define what is a SCORP and how to align with state specific requirements.
    • List three tips/resources to assist in the planning process.

    Eric Feldbaum, CPRP

    Director of the Office of Community Recreation

    New Hampshire Division of Parks and Recreation within the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

    Eric has been with the Division for nine years and resides in Concord NH with his fiancé Rahkiya and dog Daisy.  While living in NH full time since 2011 he has been continuously exploring all the great recreational opportunities the state has to offer.


    He was finally able to land his dream job working for NH State Parks. One of his responsibilities is overseeing the Land and Water Conservation Fund for the State of New Hampshire as designated by the Governor. Since beginning this role Eric has awarded over $12 million to 40 NH local communities for acquisition and development of outdoor recreation.


    Eric’s passion for this program has led him to become an executive board member on the National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers (NASORLO), an organization whose primary role is to advocate for the state assistance program for the Land and Water Conservation Fund. As a result of his work at the national level in training and advocacy, he has been awarded the Service to NASORLO Award two consecutive years (2020 and 2021). Whether he is meeting with local communities or congressional members he continues to educate people about the Land and Water Conservation Fund and he is excited to share that with you today which he hopes will lead to you all submitting great grant applications.

    Andy Bohannon, CPRP, AFO

    Parks, Recreation and Facilities Director

    Keene, NH

    Andy Bohannon, CPRP, AFO is Parks, Recreation and Facilities Director for the City of Keene, NH. A native of son, Andy grew up in Wheelock Park attending the parks and recreation programs. He began working for the City in 1987 as a youth basketball official, and then worked at the pools, playground program, and as a building supervisor though his college years at Keene State.


    Since joining the city on a professional level in 2004, he has increased program offerings, established master plans, created pocket parks, improved the trail system, and created sponsorship opportunities, promoted Keene as a great place to work, stay and play. In 2005, he piloted the CATCH program for the Foundation for Healthy Communities and the success of the program spread to over 100 communities around the state. His work with a local coalition called Advocates for Healthy Youth led to his selection as a recipient of the inaugural President’s Council and Sports Community Leadership Award in 2007. In 2018 he received the NH Recreation and Parks distinguished WINK Tapply Professional Award for his service to the association.  

    Inés Palacios, PhD (Moderator)

    Training & Professional Development Manager

    PlayCore / CORE

    Inés is responsible for promoting the value of recreation for people of all ages and abilities. She provides continuing educational opportunities, professional development, and research that supports recreation and play while generating partnerships and alliances in the field. She joined the PlayCore team in August 2013 after obtaining her PhD in Parks, Recreation and Tourism from NC State University. Before joining PlayCore, she was an instructor at NC State University in the Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management Department. In addition, she has experience in event planning, program management, research, and national presentations. Inés is based out of Raleigh, NC.

    This session will offer the following credits:   


    image

    0.1 IACET CEU


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Disclosure:

    PlayCore discloses an interest in attendees partnering with our brands on their play and recreation initiatives.

    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/12/2020

    The webinar contains examples and tangible steps to implementing Play Streets in any community as well as case studies illustrating how each of our four community partners created and implemented Play Streets.

    Across the U.S., Play Streets are being implemented in urban areas as temporary street closures that for a specified time period create safe spaces for play; however, these temporary play spaces can be used to encourage active play in rural areas as well. Play Streets are considered one way to address health disparities in children’s health and physical activity by providing places for safe play in neighborhoods and communities without access to safe and well-maintained parks and playgrounds. PARC has collaborated with ChangeLab Solutions to develop a resource guide on planning and implementing Play Streets in diverse rural low-income communities, which sometimes lack opportunities for safe physical activity. The guide contains templates and tangible steps to implementing Play Streets in any community as well as case studies illustrating how each of our four community partners created and implemented Play Streets. Drs. Keshia Pollack Porter and Renée Umstattd Meyer will be joined by Mrs. Micah Holcombe who led and continues to lead Play Streets as an Extension Agent within her rural community in central Texas. In addition, considerations for implementing Play Streets during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic will be discussed.


    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe what Play Streets are and how they encourage active play.
    • Identify key steps to implementing Play Streets in their own communities.
    • Discuss how Play Streets might be added to existing events to encourage activity.

    M. Renée Umstattd Meyer, PhD

    MCHES Professor, Department of Public Health

    Baylor University

    Dr. Umstattd Meyer is a Professor of Public Health and the Associate Dean for Research in the Baylor University Robbins College of Health and Human Sciences who is recognized nationally and internationally for her work with diverse underserved and rural communities. Her research aims to better understand and promote physical activity for all people across the lifespan, specifically acknowledging the importance of and interrelationships among behavioral, environmental, and policy factors.

    She works with communities using mixed methods to understand cultural context and advance approaches and policies to foster healthy and active opportunities and lifestyles for all people, focusing much of her work on partnering with underserved rural communities and families. She co-leads the PAPREN Rural Active Living Workgroup and a Voices For Healthy Kids IEE special interest group focused on Activating Rural America. She has been invited to serve on advisory panels and/or lead webinars for Voices for Healthy Kids, America Walks, the Active Living Conference, and is a Past-President for the American Academy of Health Behavior, a multidisciplinary society of health behavior scholars and researchers.

    Keshia Pollack Porter, PhD, MPH

    Vice Dean for Faculty and Professor

    Health Policy and Management / Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    Dr. Pollock Porter is the Vice Dean for Faculty and Professor of Health Policy and Management at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Pollock Porter is a policy researcher advancing health equity using tools such as health impact assessments and strategies that promote health in all policies. Her research informs the development and implementation of policies and environments that promote equity and safety where people live, work, play, and travel.

    Micah Holcombe

    AgriLife Extension Service, Extension Agent, Family and Community Health

    Texas A&M, Milam County TX

    Russ Carson, PhD (Moderator)

    Research and Health & Wellness Advisor

    PlayCore

    Russ has over 20 years of experience as a university Professor in kinesiology and public health, applied researcher, and PlayCore scholar and author of PlayOn! Russ is a passionate speaker on topics of comprehensive health and wellness and a committed champion of research translation and application. He is currently PlayCore’s Research Advisor dedicated to helping professionals turn research into practice for community health impact. Russ lives, works, and plays in northern Colorado.

    This session will offer the following credits:

         image

         0.1 IACET CEU


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements:

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "contents" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/11/2020

    The Youth Engagement and Action for Health (YEAH!) project works nationally with African American, American Indian, Latino, Asian, and Pacific Islander lower-income urban/rural middle schoolers to take an in-depth look at their neighborhood’s strengths and weaknesses that are most likely to affect physical activity. Using a group-based program curriculum that is designed to help youth advocate for policy/environmental changes that promote physical activity, youth collect information through small groups and are taught to set priorities for improvements around problems they identify.

    The Youth Engagement and Action for Health (YEAH!) project works nationally with African American, American Indian, Latino, Asian, and Pacific Islander lower-income urban/rural middle schoolers to take an in-depth look at their neighborhood’s strengths and weaknesses that are most likely to affect physical activity. Using a group-based program curriculum that is designed to help youth advocate for policy/environmental changes that promote physical activity, youth collect information through small groups and are taught to set priorities for improvements around problems they identify. YEAH! led to increases in the number of days youth spent being physically active and improved outcomes along multiple attitudinal and health-related measures among low-income and diverse racial and ethnic minority youth living in different types of geographic locations. Youth also learn how to communicate with decision-makers and to advocate for the changes needed to advance the walkability, safety, and physical activity options in their communities. Additionally, this webinar will touch on the implications of this research for youth physical activity and remote engagement resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.


    Learning Objectives:

    • Discuss how to use this curriculum in their own communities.
    • Identify ways YEAH! increases the number of days youth are physically active
    • Outline a successful approach to involve youth in advocating for change.


    Dr. Nisha D. Botchwey

    Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning

    Georgia Institute of Technology

    Dr. Botchwey’s impacts on the field of physical activity are based on her planning, public health and equity research. She is an Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning at the Georgia Institute of Technology and an adjunct professor in Emory University’s School of Public Health. Dr. Botchwey is a member of the Physical Activity Research Center (PARC) and directs the Built Environment and Public Health Clearinghouse. 

    She is co-author of Health Impact Assessment in the USA (2014), convener of a national expert panel on interdisciplinary workforce training between the public health and community design fields, and author of numerous articles, scientific presentations and workshops. Dr. Botchwey has won distinctions including an NSF ADVANCE Woman of Excellence Faculty Award, the Georgia Power Professor of Excellence Award, a Rockefeller-Penn Fellowship from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Nursing and a Nominated Changemaker by the Obama White House’ Council on Women and Girls. She has also served on the Advisory Committee to the Director for the Centers of Disease Control Prevention and the Voices for Healthy Kids Strategic Advisory Committee for the American Heart Association.

    Dr. Botchwey’s current focus is on youth advocacy for physical activity and community wellbeing.

    Areas of Discipline: Promoting physical activity; City planning; Youth advocacy; Health equity

    Rachel Millstein

    Clinical Psychologist

    General Hospital and Assistant Professor in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

    Dr. Rachel Millstein is a clinical psychologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Her research focuses on chronic disease prevention and the intersection of emotions and health. Her clinical interests include evidence-based therapies, positive psychology, and mindfulness techniques for improving mood, anxiety, and well-being.

    Dr. Millstein earned her PhD from her San Diego State University and completed a fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Kim Bryan

    Special Education Specialist,

    Glades Middle School, FL

    This session will offer the following credits:

         image

         0.1 IACET CEU


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements:

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "contents" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/11/2020

    Schools are considered ideal settings for advancing health and wellness initiatives for youth. Most youth attend schools, most schools have resources for health and wellness, and most schools are located in communities with park and recreation agencies. National frameworks even exist for school health and school physical activity where community engagement is identified as a key component for building healthier generations of youth. The challenge is how. How can park and recreation professionals successfully engage and partner with schools to collectively support health and wellness initiatives for youth?

    Schools are considered ideal settings for advancing health and wellness initiatives for youth. Most youth attend schools, most schools have resources for health and wellness, and most schools are located in communities with park and recreation agencies. National frameworks even exist for school health and school physical activity where community engagement is identified as a key component for building healthier generations of youth. The challenge is how. How can park and recreation professionals successfully engage and partner with schools to collectively support health and wellness initiatives for youth?


    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify 3 strategies for successfully engaging schools to collectively promote health & wellness among youth.
    • Identify ways to overcome barriers for engaging schools.
    • Identify new opportunities to successfully partner with schools in your community.
    • Describe at least 2 case examples shared through the session.


    Russ Carson, PhD

    Research and Health & Wellness Advisor

    PlayCore

    Russ has over 20 years of experience as a university Professor in kinesiology and public health, applied researcher, and PlayCore scholar and author of PlayOn! Russ is a passionate speaker on topics of comprehensive health and wellness and a committed champion of research translation and application. He is currently PlayCore’s Research Advisor dedicated to helping professionals turn research into practice for community health impact. Russ lives, works, and plays in northern Colorado.

    Charlene R. Burgeson

    Chief Program Officer, Action for Healthy Kids; Executive Director, Active Schools

    Active Schools

    Charlene Burgeson is Chief Program Officer at Action for Healthy Kids and Executive Director of Active Schools, a national collective impact initiative that resides at Action for Healthy Kids. The Active Schools movement is working to make 60 minutes of before, during, and after school physical activity the norm in our nation’s K-12 schools.


    Burgeson has provided national leadership for over 25 years. Previously she was with the CDC, National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) which is now SHAPE America, and Save the Children.


    Her personal passions include being a mom, participating in many sport and recreational activities, traveling, reading, and volunteering

    Inés Palacios, PhD (Moderator)

    Training & Professional Development Manager

    PlayCore / CORE

    Inés is responsible for promoting the value of recreation for people of all ages and abilities. She provides continuing educational opportunities, professional development, and research that supports recreation and play while generating partnerships and alliances in the field. She joined the PlayCore team in August 2013 after obtaining her PhD in Parks, Recreation and Tourism from NC State University. Before joining PlayCore, she was an instructor at NC State University in the Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management Department. In addition, she has experience in event planning, program management, research, and national presentations. Inés is based out of Raleigh, NC.

    This session will offer the following credits:

         

    image


    0.1 IACET CEU
     


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "contents" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:


    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/16/2020

    ​A comprehensive school physical activity program (CSPAP) is the guiding framework for implementing physical activity opportunities across the school day and school context. The goal of a CSPAP is to provide daily opportunities and support structures for youth to engage in and benefit from a physically active lifestyle. Regular health-enhancing physical activity behaviors among youth can be accomplished across five CSPAP components: a) physical education, b) physical activity during school, c) physical activity before and after school, d) staff involvement, and e) family and community engagement. This comprehensive approach to active school settings has advanced evidence-based practices and opportunities for community collaborations.

    A comprehensive school physical activity program (CSPAP) is the guiding framework for implementing physical activity opportunities across the school day and school context. The goal of a CSPAP is to provide daily opportunities and support structures for youth to engage in and benefit from a physically active lifestyle. Regular health-enhancing physical activity behaviors among youth can be accomplished across five CSPAP components: a) physical education, b) physical activity during school, c) physical activity before and after school, d) staff involvement, and e) family and community engagement. This comprehensive approach to active school settings has advanced evidence-based practices and opportunities for community collaborations.


    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe the CSPAP framework and the many benefits of a comprehensive approach to active schools on youth, schools, and local communities.
    • Explain key strategies for implementing a CSPAP and components of it.
    • Identify effective evidence-based practices across the five CSPAP components, diverse school contexts and unique community settings.
    • Identify approaches to guide CSPAP collaboration within local communities.
    • Identify latest CSPAP resources for advancing evidence-based practice and community collaborations.

    Russ Carson, PhD

    Research and Health & Wellness Advisor

    PlayCore

    Russ has over 20 years of experience as a university Professor in kinesiology and public health, applied researcher, and PlayCore scholar and author of PlayOn! Russ is a passionate speaker on topics of comprehensive health and wellness and a committed champion of research translation and application. He is currently PlayCore’s Research Advisor dedicated to helping professionals turn research into practice for community health impact. Russ lives, works, and plays in northern Colorado.

    Collin Webster, PhD

    Associate Dean for Research and Innovation, Professor of Physical Education

    University of South Carolina

    Collin Webster earned his Ph.D. in physical education and sport studies from the University of Georgia in 2006 and has held academic appointments at the University of South Carolina (2006- 2012; 2013-present) and the University of Wollongong in Australia (2012-2013). He is currently a professor in the Department of Physical Education at UofSC and has served as Department Chair and as Associate Dean for Research and Innovation for the UofSC College of Education.

    With over 100 publications and numerous presentations to national and international audiences, he is a widely recognized scholar in the area of youth physical activity promotion. The core focus of Dr. Webster's research is on comprehensive school physical activity programs, including best practices for program implementation, monitoring, and sustainability.


    Dr. Webster was an invited research fellow with the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science at Tokyo Gakugei University in 2011 and with the Priority Research Center in Physical Activity and Nutrition at the University of Newcastle, Australia in 2012. He is also a research fellow with the Society of Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE) America.


    Prior to his academic career, Dr. Webster worked as a physical education and health teacher at international schools in the Dominican Republic and Dubai. He is a "Third Culture Kid" who grew up in Pakistan, Singapore, Cyprus, and Taiwan. https://sc.edu/study/colleges_schools/education/faculty-staff/webster_collin.php

    Inés Palacios, PhD (Moderator)

    Training & Professional Development Manager

    PlayCore / CORE

    Inés is responsible for promoting the value of recreation for people of all ages and abilities. She provides continuing educational opportunities, professional development, and research that supports recreation and play while generating partnerships and alliances in the field. She joined the PlayCore team in August 2013 after obtaining her PhD in Parks, Recreation and Tourism from NC State University. Before joining PlayCore, she was an instructor at NC State University in the Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management Department. In addition, she has experience in event planning, program management, research, and national presentations. Inés is based out of Raleigh, NC.

    This session will offer the following credits:

         

    image


    0.1 IACET CEU



    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "contents" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:


    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com