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  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 12/08/2022 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    To share the great work in Parks and Recreation agencies, join us for Good News, a monthly, interactive Zoom show where leading park and recreation professionals will share best practices that inform their work and the resulting positive impacts on communities.

    Good News: In Parks! is a show for parks and recreation professionals by parks and recreation professionals. Join us for an exciting season 3 where leading local leaders discuss wins and challenges and creative ways they have overcome these challenges. They are here to share their learned best practices with you, so bring your coffee, your questions for the Q&A, and enjoy this live broadcast full of only Good News!

     

    Learning objectives:

    1. Identify relevant park and recreation essential services offered during these ever-changing times.
    2. Describe innovative strategies that park directors are utilizing to react to challenges and community needs.
    3. Discuss collaborative partnerships and/or leadership examples for the administration of facilities and programs that demonstrate success and resiliency.

    Justin Cutler

    Commissioner

    City of Atlanta Department of Parks and Recreation / Atlanta, GA

    Anthony-Paul (AP) Diaz

    Superintendent

    Seattle Parks and Recreation Department / Seattle, WA

    M. Renee' Johnson

    Assistant Director

    City of Dallas Parks and Recreation Department / Dallas, TX

    Anne-Marie Spencer (Moderator)

    Corporate Vice President of Marketing and Communications

    PlayCore

    Anne-Marie joined the PlayCore team in 2002, and is responsible for corporate marketing, communications and special project development for PlayCore, as well as serving as the company spokesperson and coordinator for all brand efforts, including advertising, promotion, trade show design, and external/internal communications. Anne-Marie is committed to building communities through play and recreation by motivating the marketing teams with creativity and encouragement, serving on the Board of Directors at the Chambliss Center for Children.


    Anne-Marie is a competitive obstacle course racer, and says “I love the variety, we carry and throw heavy objects, swing from our hands, throw spears, and scale high walls. It allows me to test my fitness and become a more well-rounded athlete and person.”

    Jodie Adams (Moderator)

    Parks Director Emeritus, Past President NRPA BOD

    Brio 2 Solutions

    Jodie Adams possesses 37 years of Administrative experience in the Parks and Recreation profession. She retired as the Director of Parks, Springfield-Greene County Park Board, serving from January 2006 – November 2011. In this position she was responsible for a 34 million dollar budget, 102 Parks and Trails, 1000 Program/Events and 40 Facilities which included a Zoo and Botanical Center. As a longtime member of NRPA, she served on the NRPA Board of Directors for eight years and served as the President from 2009-2010. Adams is also a Fellow member of the American Academy of Parks and Recreation Administration and is a Certified Parks and Recreation Professional (CPRP).


    Since retirement Jodie continues to be involved with the profession. She is the co-founder of Brio 2 Solutions, Inc. She retired for a second time as a Faculty Emeritus member of Missouri State University where she taught for the past 10 years from 2011-2021. Adams is also a Fellow member of the American Academy of Parks and Recreation Administration and is a Certified Parks and Recreation Professional (CPRP).

    This session will offer the following credits:

    image
    0.1 IACET CEU


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback survey.


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "contents" tab above to complete the associated survey for this webinar.

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions or to request a copy of the written transcript for this session, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Learning objectives: Summarize the LWCF funding expectations after being awarded and for long term sustainability and compliance; List important considerations to take as you prepare for the completion of your project; Summarize a community case example that used LWCF funding to deploy evidence-based best practices to support health and wellness; List three helpful resources to assist in project completion, celebration, and sustainability.

    A Roadmap to Successfully Accessing Funding through the Land & Water, Conservation Fund (LWCF)

    Celebrating Your Community’s LWCF Award & Completion

    In August of 2020, via the Great American Outdoor Act, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) was permanently funded at $900 million annually, offering funding opportunities for eligible projects to support land acquisition, recreational facility improvements and park planning projects. The National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers (NASORLO) have developed a roadmap and a variety of resources to help you navigate the requirements and outline the process for submitting a standout project application for your state’s LWCF State Assistance Program. Every project starts with a great idea!  Case examples will offer a step-by-step roadmap through the planning process, project completion, and sustainability phases and arm you for success.


    Learning Objectives

    • Summarize the LWCF funding expectations after being awarded and for long term sustainability and compliance.
    • List important considerations to take as you prepare for the completion of your project.
    • Summarize a community case example that used LWCF funding to deploy evidence-based best practices to support health and wellness.
    • List three helpful resources to assist in project completion, celebration, and sustainability.

    Antoinette Norfleet

    Grant Manager / Land and Water Conservation Fund Program

    Georgia Department of Natural Resources

    Antoinette was born and raised in the middle Tennessee area.  She received an accounting degree from Middle Tennessee State University and began her professional career with the Tennessee State Parks system as an accountant.  She later moved to Georgia and began working for Georgia State Parks within the Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

     

    She has held various positions within DNR, and currently serves as the Grants Program Manager and Alternate State Liaison Officer for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF).  She is responsible for selecting and awarding the LWCF grants as well as overseeing the compliance aspect after grant completion.  Some of her proudest career achievements include dispelling camping myths by introducing the first-time camper concept to management, being a part of the team that won the inaugural SCORP Excellence award in 2009 and being a board member of the National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers.

    Vonda Martin

    Park Planner / Greensboro Parks and Recreation

    City of Greensboro

    Vonda Martin currently serves as the Park Planner for the City of Greensboro. Collectively, Vonda has 30+ years of experience in the field of Parks and Recreation. Over the years, she has worked in the corporate, non-profit, private, and public sectors. This includes time served as a consultant with North Carolina State University’s (NCSU’s) Recreation Resources Service and Director of the Armfield Civic and Recreation Center in Pilot Mountain, NC. Vonda obtained her Bachelor’s degree in Recreation from Catawba College and a Master of Science in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management from NCSU. She is active in the profession as the co-founder of the Women’s LeadHERship Workshop, an advisory committee member of Haw River State Park, a member of NRPA, NCRPA, and Friends of Mountain-To-Sea Trail. She is the first practitioner to be a chapter author, Physical Resource and Environmental Planning for the Management of Parks and Recreation Agencies – 5th Edition, sponsored by the Commission for Accreditation of Parks and Recreation Agencies (CAPRA) with Brie Hensold.  She is has a passion for improving outdoor recreational opportunities for all, is married to Dale Smith and they live in Chapel Hill.

    Shawna Tillery

    Planning and Project Development Division Manager / Greensboro Parks and Recreation

    City of Greensboro

    Shawna currently serves as the Planning and Project Development Division Manager from the City of Greensboro Parks and Recreation Department. In this role, she manage the departmental efforts in the areas of strategic and long-range planning, Capital Improvement Program, Capital Life Cycle Plan, and recreational bond referendums with regards to open space, greenways, trails, parkland and facilities

    Shawna completed her undergraduate degree at the University of NC at Wilmington majoring in Political Science with minors in Spanish and International Affairs. Shawna moved to Greensboro a year after completing her undergraduate degree to complete a Masters in Public Affairs at the University of NC at Greensboro.  

    Inés Palacios, PhD (Moderator)

    Training & Professional Development Manager

    PlayCore / CORE

    Inés is responsible for promoting the value of recreation for people of all ages and abilities. She provides continuing educational opportunities, professional development, and research that supports recreation and play while generating partnerships and alliances in the field. She joined the PlayCore team in August 2013 after obtaining her PhD in Parks, Recreation and Tourism from NC State University. Before joining PlayCore, she was an instructor at NC State University in the Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management Department. In addition, she has experience in event planning, program management, research, and national presentations. Inés is based out of Raleigh, NC.

    This session will offer the following credits:   

    image

    0.1 IACET CEU


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Disclosure:

    PlayCore discloses an interest in attendees partnering with our brands on their play and recreation initiatives.

    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Learning objectives: Define the critical steps of planning and developing a LWCF project; Outline the steps to creating and managing a project timeline; Summarize a successful case example of a public outdoor recreation project funded through LWCF; List three helpful tips/resources to assist in submitting a successful application.

    A Roadmap to Successfully Accessing Funding through the Land & Water, Conservation Fund (LWCF)

    Concept to Application: Explore a LWCF Project Case Example

    In August of 2020, via the Great American Outdoor Act, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) was permanently funded at $900 million annually, offering funding opportunities for eligible projects to support land acquisition, recreational facility improvements and park planning projects. The National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers (NASORLO) have developed a roadmap and a variety of resources to help you navigate the requirements and outline the process for submitting a standout project application for your state’s LWCF State Assistance Program. Every project starts with a great idea!  Case examples will offer a step-by-step roadmap through the planning process, project completion, and sustainability phases and arm you for success.

    Learning Objectives

    • Define the critical steps of planning and developing a LWCF project.
    • Outline the steps to creating and managing a project timeline.
    • Summarize a successful case example of a public outdoor recreation project funded through LWCF.
    • List three helpful tips/resources to assist in submitting a successful application.


    Andy Bohannon, CPRP, AFO

    Parks, Recreation and Facilities Director

    Keene, NH

    Andy Bohannon, CPRP, AFO is Parks, Recreation and Facilities Director for the City of Keene, NH. A native of son, Andy grew up in Wheelock Park attending the parks and recreation programs. He began working for the City in 1987 as a youth basketball official, and then worked at the pools, playground program, and as a building supervisor though his college years at Keene State.


    Since joining the city on a professional level in 2004, he has increased program offerings, established master plans, created pocket parks, improved the trail system, and created sponsorship opportunities, promoted Keene as a great place to work, stay and play. In 2005, he piloted the CATCH program for the Foundation for Healthy Communities and the success of the program spread to over 100 communities around the state. His work with a local coalition called Advocates for Healthy Youth led to his selection as a recipient of the inaugural President’s Council and Sports Community Leadership Award in 2007. In 2018 he received the NH Recreation and Parks distinguished WINK Tapply Professional Award for his service to the association.  

    Eric Feldbaum, CPRP

    Director of the Office of Community Recreation

    New Hampshire Division of Parks and Recreation within the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

    Eric has been with the Division for nine years and resides in Concord NH with his fiancé Rahkiya and dog Daisy.  While living in NH full time since 2011 he has been continuously exploring all the great recreational opportunities the state has to offer.


    He was finally able to land his dream job working for NH State Parks. One of his responsibilities is overseeing the Land and Water Conservation Fund for the State of New Hampshire as designated by the Governor. Since beginning this role Eric has awarded over $12 million to 40 NH local communities for acquisition and development of outdoor recreation.


    Eric’s passion for this program has led him to become an executive board member on the National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers (NASORLO), an organization whose primary role is to advocate for the state assistance program for the Land and Water Conservation Fund. As a result of his work at the national level in training and advocacy, he has been awarded the Service to NASORLO Award two consecutive years (2020 and 2021). Whether he is meeting with local communities or congressional members he continues to educate people about the Land and Water Conservation Fund and he is excited to share that with you today which he hopes will lead to you all submitting great grant applications.

    Inés Palacios, PhD (Moderator)

    Training & Professional Development Manager

    PlayCore / CORE

    Inés is responsible for promoting the value of recreation for people of all ages and abilities. She provides continuing educational opportunities, professional development, and research that supports recreation and play while generating partnerships and alliances in the field. She joined the PlayCore team in August 2013 after obtaining her PhD in Parks, Recreation and Tourism from NC State University. Before joining PlayCore, she was an instructor at NC State University in the Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management Department. In addition, she has experience in event planning, program management, research, and national presentations. Inés is based out of Raleigh, NC.

    This session will offer the following credits:   

    image

    0.1 IACET CEU


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Disclosure:

    PlayCore discloses an interest in attendees partnering with our brands on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Learning objectives: Summarize the goals of the LWCF State Assistance Program; Outline the eligibility requirements to receive LWCF funding for a public outdoor recreation project; Define what is a SCORP and how to align with state specific requirements; List three tips/resources to assist in the planning process.

    A Roadmap to Successfully Accessing Funding through the Land & Water, Conservation Fund (LWCF)

    LWCF 101: Program Overview & Helpful Tips to Get Started

    In August of 2020, via the Great American Outdoor Act, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) was permanently funded at $900 million annually, offering funding opportunities for eligible projects to support land acquisition, recreational facility improvements and park planning projects. The National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers (NASORLO) have developed a roadmap and a variety of resources to help you navigate the requirements and outline the process for submitting a standout project application for your state’s LWCF State Assistance Program. Every project starts with a great idea!  Case examples will offer a step-by-step roadmap through the planning process, project completion, and sustainability phases and arm you for success.

    Learning Objectives

    • Summarize the goals of the LWCF State Assistance Program.
    • Outline the eligibility requirements to receive LWCF funding for a public outdoor recreation project.
    • Define what is a SCORP and how to align with state specific requirements.
    • List three tips/resources to assist in the planning process.

    Eric Feldbaum, CPRP

    Director of the Office of Community Recreation

    New Hampshire Division of Parks and Recreation within the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

    Eric has been with the Division for nine years and resides in Concord NH with his fiancé Rahkiya and dog Daisy.  While living in NH full time since 2011 he has been continuously exploring all the great recreational opportunities the state has to offer.


    He was finally able to land his dream job working for NH State Parks. One of his responsibilities is overseeing the Land and Water Conservation Fund for the State of New Hampshire as designated by the Governor. Since beginning this role Eric has awarded over $12 million to 40 NH local communities for acquisition and development of outdoor recreation.


    Eric’s passion for this program has led him to become an executive board member on the National Association of State Outdoor Recreation Liaison Officers (NASORLO), an organization whose primary role is to advocate for the state assistance program for the Land and Water Conservation Fund. As a result of his work at the national level in training and advocacy, he has been awarded the Service to NASORLO Award two consecutive years (2020 and 2021). Whether he is meeting with local communities or congressional members he continues to educate people about the Land and Water Conservation Fund and he is excited to share that with you today which he hopes will lead to you all submitting great grant applications.

    Andy Bohannon, CPRP, AFO

    Parks, Recreation and Facilities Director

    Keene, NH

    Andy Bohannon, CPRP, AFO is Parks, Recreation and Facilities Director for the City of Keene, NH. A native of son, Andy grew up in Wheelock Park attending the parks and recreation programs. He began working for the City in 1987 as a youth basketball official, and then worked at the pools, playground program, and as a building supervisor though his college years at Keene State.


    Since joining the city on a professional level in 2004, he has increased program offerings, established master plans, created pocket parks, improved the trail system, and created sponsorship opportunities, promoted Keene as a great place to work, stay and play. In 2005, he piloted the CATCH program for the Foundation for Healthy Communities and the success of the program spread to over 100 communities around the state. His work with a local coalition called Advocates for Healthy Youth led to his selection as a recipient of the inaugural President’s Council and Sports Community Leadership Award in 2007. In 2018 he received the NH Recreation and Parks distinguished WINK Tapply Professional Award for his service to the association.  

    Inés Palacios, PhD (Moderator)

    Training & Professional Development Manager

    PlayCore / CORE

    Inés is responsible for promoting the value of recreation for people of all ages and abilities. She provides continuing educational opportunities, professional development, and research that supports recreation and play while generating partnerships and alliances in the field. She joined the PlayCore team in August 2013 after obtaining her PhD in Parks, Recreation and Tourism from NC State University. Before joining PlayCore, she was an instructor at NC State University in the Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management Department. In addition, she has experience in event planning, program management, research, and national presentations. Inés is based out of Raleigh, NC.

    This session will offer the following credits:   


    image

    0.1 IACET CEU


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey.


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "Event Details" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Disclosure:

    PlayCore discloses an interest in attendees partnering with our brands on their play and recreation initiatives.

    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/03/2022

    Biophilic design comes from biophilia, which literally means a love of nature but also recognizes human dependency on nature. The concept was popularized by Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson, and Yale social ecologist Stephen Kellert. Design activates biophilia by creating equitable places of everyday life, where people and nature intersect, beginning in early childhood. Research strongly suggests that nature has multiple positive impacts on health and wellbeing across the human lifecycle and promotes caring for the planet and each other. Sixty years ago, Only One Earth was published, warning us to care for the health of our biosphere and the deadly consequences of not doing so – now looming. The good news is that international treaties and conventions developed, expanded, and refined over the last several decades can now empower action. Inspiring international examples, design strategies, principles, and practices, at the building, site, neighborhood, and city scale will focus on biophilic design thinking applied to urban neighborhoods, parks and playgrounds, child development centers and schools, streets and greenways, health facilities, and multi-use commercial districts. The growing body of research will be translated into human centered design action to restore and conserve nature in daily life. Landscape architects, architects, planners, park and recreation professionals, and others involved may see themselves as cultural change agents and planetary lifeguards supporting human evolution in a healthy, equitable direction.

    Biophilic design comes from biophilia, which literally means a love of nature but also recognizes human dependency on nature. The concept was popularized by Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson, and Yale social ecologist Stephen Kellert. Design activates biophilia by creating equitable places of everyday life, where people and nature intersect, beginning in early childhood.

    Research strongly suggests that nature has multiple positive impacts on health and wellbeing across the human lifecycle and promotes caring for the planet and each other. Sixty years ago, Only One Earth was published, warning us to care for the health of our biosphere and the deadly consequences of not doing so – now looming. The good news is that international treaties and conventions developed, expanded, and refined over the last several decades can now empower action.

    Inspiring international examples, design strategies, principles, and practices, at the building, site, neighborhood, and city scale will focus on biophilic design thinking applied to urban neighborhoods, parks and playgrounds, child development centers and schools, streets and greenways, health facilities, and multi-use commercial districts. The growing body of research will be translated into human centered design action to restore and conserve nature in daily life. Landscape architects, architects, planners, park and recreation professionals, and others involved may see themselves as cultural change agents and planetary lifeguards supporting human evolution in a healthy, equitable direction.

     

    Learning Obejctives

    • Describe biophilic design as a response to increasing global urbanization, framed by supportive international treaties, policies, and goals.
    • Explain biophilic design as an environment-behavior design concept equitably linking health of the biosphere to human health and wellbeing across individual lifespans and generations.
    • Apply biophilic design as an equitable, measurable, nature-based solution to conserving, restoring, and creating urban biodiversity in the built environments of daily life.
    • Apply biophilic design strategies, principles, policies, practices, and measures that also imply necessary changes to built environment regulatory systems.


    Brought to you By

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                          Natural Learning Initative

    Robin Moore, Dipl Arch, MCP, ASLA

    Professor of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning and Co-founder of the Natural Learning Initiative

    Natural Learning Initiative, College of Design / NC State University

    Robin Moore is Professor of Landscape Architecture and co-founder of the Natural Learning Initiative (NLI), College of Design, NC State University. He holds degrees in architecture (London) and city and regional planning (MIT) and is an honorary member of the ASLA. During his long career as educator, researcher, and practitioner, Moore has developed an interdisciplinary, environment & behavior approach to built environments design for children and families in low-resource communities in North Carolina and beyond. Moore is an international authority on the intergenerational design of urban play and learning environments, with a focus on engagement with nature. He is former chair of the Environmental Design Research Association, former president of the International Play Association, and a member of the UNESCO “Growing Up in Cities” research team. Recent publications include the Design for Healthy Childhoods and a Healthy Planet, in Biophilic Design. In 2021 Professor Moore received the Alexander Quarles Holladay Medal for Excellence, the highest honor bestowed by NC State University.

    Inés Palacios, PhD (Moderator)

    Training & Professional Development Manager

    PlayCore / CORE

    Inés is responsible for promoting the value of recreation for people of all ages and abilities. She provides continuing educational opportunities, professional development, and research that supports recreation and play while generating partnerships and alliances in the field. She joined the PlayCore team in August 2013 after obtaining her PhD in Parks, Recreation and Tourism from NC State University. Before joining PlayCore, she was an instructor at NC State University in the Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management Department. In addition, she has experience in event planning, program management, research, and national presentations. Inés is based out of Raleigh, NC.

    This session will offer the following credits:

         

    image
    image  
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    1. IACET CEU /
     1.0 AIA HSW LU /  1.0 LA/CES HSW PDH


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (.1 IACET CEU / 1.0 AIA HSW LU / 1.0 LA/CES HSW PDH) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "contents" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/12/2020

    The webinar contains examples and tangible steps to implementing Play Streets in any community as well as case studies illustrating how each of our four community partners created and implemented Play Streets.

    Across the U.S., Play Streets are being implemented in urban areas as temporary street closures that for a specified time period create safe spaces for play; however, these temporary play spaces can be used to encourage active play in rural areas as well. Play Streets are considered one way to address health disparities in children’s health and physical activity by providing places for safe play in neighborhoods and communities without access to safe and well-maintained parks and playgrounds. PARC has collaborated with ChangeLab Solutions to develop a resource guide on planning and implementing Play Streets in diverse rural low-income communities, which sometimes lack opportunities for safe physical activity. The guide contains templates and tangible steps to implementing Play Streets in any community as well as case studies illustrating how each of our four community partners created and implemented Play Streets. Drs. Keshia Pollack Porter and Renée Umstattd Meyer will be joined by Mrs. Micah Holcombe who led and continues to lead Play Streets as an Extension Agent within her rural community in central Texas. In addition, considerations for implementing Play Streets during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic will be discussed.


    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe what Play Streets are and how they encourage active play.
    • Identify key steps to implementing Play Streets in their own communities.
    • Discuss how Play Streets might be added to existing events to encourage activity.

    M. Renée Umstattd Meyer, PhD

    MCHES Professor, Department of Public Health

    Baylor University

    Dr. Umstattd Meyer is a Professor of Public Health and the Associate Dean for Research in the Baylor University Robbins College of Health and Human Sciences who is recognized nationally and internationally for her work with diverse underserved and rural communities. Her research aims to better understand and promote physical activity for all people across the lifespan, specifically acknowledging the importance of and interrelationships among behavioral, environmental, and policy factors.

    She works with communities using mixed methods to understand cultural context and advance approaches and policies to foster healthy and active opportunities and lifestyles for all people, focusing much of her work on partnering with underserved rural communities and families. She co-leads the PAPREN Rural Active Living Workgroup and a Voices For Healthy Kids IEE special interest group focused on Activating Rural America. She has been invited to serve on advisory panels and/or lead webinars for Voices for Healthy Kids, America Walks, the Active Living Conference, and is a Past-President for the American Academy of Health Behavior, a multidisciplinary society of health behavior scholars and researchers.

    Keshia Pollack Porter, PhD, MPH

    Vice Dean for Faculty and Professor

    Health Policy and Management / Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    Dr. Pollock Porter is the Vice Dean for Faculty and Professor of Health Policy and Management at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Pollock Porter is a policy researcher advancing health equity using tools such as health impact assessments and strategies that promote health in all policies. Her research informs the development and implementation of policies and environments that promote equity and safety where people live, work, play, and travel.

    Micah Holcombe

    AgriLife Extension Service, Extension Agent, Family and Community Health

    Texas A&M, Milam County TX

    Russ Carson, PhD (Moderator)

    Research and Health & Wellness Advisor

    PlayCore

    Russ has over 20 years of experience as a university Professor in kinesiology and public health, applied researcher, and PlayCore scholar and author of PlayOn! Russ is a passionate speaker on topics of comprehensive health and wellness and a committed champion of research translation and application. He is currently PlayCore’s Research Advisor dedicated to helping professionals turn research into practice for community health impact. Russ lives, works, and plays in northern Colorado.

    This session will offer the following credits:

         image

         0.1 IACET CEU


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements:

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "contents" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/08/2020

    This webinar will focus on how and where children from specific ethnic/racial subgroups are active and inactive during the school year and summer and how parks and recreation can specifically increase physical activity among kids under 14 years of age. Additionally, this webinar will touch on the implications of this research for parks and physical activity during the time of COVID-19.

    This webinar will focus on how and where children from specific ethnic/racial subgroups are active and inactive during the school year and summer and how parks and recreation can specifically increase physical activity among kids under 14 years of age. Additionally, this webinar will touch on the implications of this research for parks and physical activity during the time of COVID-19.


    Learning Objectives:

    • Being able to name 2 race/ethnic groups of adolescents found to have the lowest physical activity in the summer. 
    • Identifying what type of physical activity was most preferred for virtually all subgroups of low-income adolescents? 
    • Identifying what park and recreation facility and programming recommendations are there to increase physical activity low-income among children and adolescents?


    Jim Sallis, PhD

    Distinguished Professor Emeritus

    Family and Preventive Medicine / University of California San Diego and Professorial Fellow / Australian Catholic University, Melbourne

    Dr. Sallis has made contributions to the field of physical activity in the areas of measurement, correlates of physical activity, intervention, and advocacy. His health improvement programs have been studied and used in health care settings, schools, universities, and companies. As Director of Active Living Research he helped build an interdisciplinary field of study on the role of environments and policies in physical activity. He is an author of over 700 scientific publications, co-author of several books, on the editorial boards of several journals, and one of the world's most cited authors.

    Dr. Sallis has received awards for his science from the American College of Sports Medicine, Society of Behavioral Medicine, and American Psychological Association Division of Health Psychology. He received a lifetime achievement award in 2011 from the President's Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. His current focus is using research to inform policy and environmental changes that will increase physical activity and reduce childhood obesity.

    Aaron Hipp, PhD

    Associate Professor of Community Health and Sustainability

    Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management / North Carolina State University

    Dr. Hipp is a built environment and active living researcher and instructor, and has served as an Interdisciplinary Research Leader Fellow with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Hipp works collaboratively on projects related to active living and multifamily developments, parks in low-income communities of color, access to greenspace, and epidemiologic surveillance of pedestrians and bicyclists. He uses technologies and big data, including web cameras, GIS, GPS, accelerometers, and social media, to explore the relationships between place and active living.

    Chea Johnson

    Recreation Specialist

    Mecklenburg County, NC, Park and Recreation

    Russ Carson, PhD (Moderator)

    Research and Health & Wellness Advisor

    PlayCore

    Russ has over 20 years of experience as a university Professor in kinesiology and public health, applied researcher, and PlayCore scholar and author of PlayOn! Russ is a passionate speaker on topics of comprehensive health and wellness and a committed champion of research translation and application. He is currently PlayCore’s Research Advisor dedicated to helping professionals turn research into practice for community health impact. Russ lives, works, and plays in northern Colorado.

    This session will offer the following credits:

         image

         0.1 IACET CEU


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements:

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "contents" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/01/2020

    For weeks of working and schooling at home, parents and families have experienced firsthand the importance (and implications) of daily physical activity. Now, with summer months ahead, what is known about summertime youth physical activity and strategies that will help families and youth be active during COVID-19? Join us for a virtual chat with leading international scholars on the topic as they share their research-based recommendations and answer your questions. Recommended reading and viewing: An article by Drs. Sallis and Pratt — A Call to Action: Physical Activity and COVID-19 Read the Research — Youth Physical Activity in Summer vs. School Year: Patterns and Disparities Disclaimer: The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands. 

    For weeks of working and schooling at home, parents and families have experienced firsthand the importance (and implications) of daily physical activity. Now, with summer months ahead, what is known about summertime youth physical activity and strategies that will help families and youth be active during COVID-19? Join us for a virtual chat with leading international scholars on the topic as they share their research-based recommendations and answer your questions.

    Recommended reading and viewing:
    A Call to Action: Physical Activity and COVID-19
    Youth Physical Activity in Summer vs. School Year: Patterns and Disparities


    Jim Sallis, PhD

    Distinguished Professor Emeritus

    Family and Preventive Medicine / University of California San Diego and Professorial Fellow / Australian Catholic University, Melbourne

    Dr. Sallis has made contributions to the field of physical activity in the areas of measurement, correlates of physical activity, intervention, and advocacy. His health improvement programs have been studied and used in health care settings, schools, universities, and companies. As Director of Active Living Research he helped build an interdisciplinary field of study on the role of environments and policies in physical activity. He is an author of over 700 scientific publications, co-author of several books, on the editorial boards of several journals, and one of the world's most cited authors.

    Dr. Sallis has received awards for his science from the American College of Sports Medicine, Society of Behavioral Medicine, and American Psychological Association Division of Health Psychology. He received a lifetime achievement award in 2011 from the President's Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. His current focus is using research to inform policy and environmental changes that will increase physical activity and reduce childhood obesity.

    Michael Pratt

    Preventative Medicine Physician

    University of California

    Dr. Pratt is a Professor in the Division of Global Health with expertise in physical activity and public health. Before coming to UC San Diego, he was a Visiting Professor in the Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, at Emory University and a Medical Officer at the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at CDC, including serving as the Senior Advisor for Global Health and as the first Chief of the Physical Activity and Health Branch.

    Dr. Pratt founded the CDC World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Physical Activity and Health and the International Physical Activity and Public Health Course. Dr. Pratt has also been an Adjunct Professor at the Schools of Medicine and Government at los Andes University in Bogotá, Colombia and a Visiting Professor at the Federal University of Pelotas in Brazil. He completed a Masters Degree in exercise physiology and Medical Degree at the University of Washington in Seattle, medical residency training at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, earned a Masters Degree in Public Health at the University of Minnesota, and is a graduate of the EIS epidemiology fellowship and preventive medicine residency at CDC.

    Russ Carson, PhD (Moderator)

    Research and Health & Wellness Advisor

    PlayCore

    Russ has over 20 years of experience as a university Professor in kinesiology and public health, applied researcher, and PlayCore scholar and author of PlayOn! Russ is a passionate speaker on topics of comprehensive health and wellness and a committed champion of research translation and application. He is currently PlayCore’s Research Advisor dedicated to helping professionals turn research into practice for community health impact. Russ lives, works, and plays in northern Colorado.

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/11/2020

    The Youth Engagement and Action for Health (YEAH!) project works nationally with African American, American Indian, Latino, Asian, and Pacific Islander lower-income urban/rural middle schoolers to take an in-depth look at their neighborhood’s strengths and weaknesses that are most likely to affect physical activity. Using a group-based program curriculum that is designed to help youth advocate for policy/environmental changes that promote physical activity, youth collect information through small groups and are taught to set priorities for improvements around problems they identify.

    The Youth Engagement and Action for Health (YEAH!) project works nationally with African American, American Indian, Latino, Asian, and Pacific Islander lower-income urban/rural middle schoolers to take an in-depth look at their neighborhood’s strengths and weaknesses that are most likely to affect physical activity. Using a group-based program curriculum that is designed to help youth advocate for policy/environmental changes that promote physical activity, youth collect information through small groups and are taught to set priorities for improvements around problems they identify. YEAH! led to increases in the number of days youth spent being physically active and improved outcomes along multiple attitudinal and health-related measures among low-income and diverse racial and ethnic minority youth living in different types of geographic locations. Youth also learn how to communicate with decision-makers and to advocate for the changes needed to advance the walkability, safety, and physical activity options in their communities. Additionally, this webinar will touch on the implications of this research for youth physical activity and remote engagement resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.


    Learning Objectives:

    • Discuss how to use this curriculum in their own communities.
    • Identify ways YEAH! increases the number of days youth are physically active
    • Outline a successful approach to involve youth in advocating for change.


    Dr. Nisha D. Botchwey

    Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning

    Georgia Institute of Technology

    Dr. Botchwey’s impacts on the field of physical activity are based on her planning, public health and equity research. She is an Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning at the Georgia Institute of Technology and an adjunct professor in Emory University’s School of Public Health. Dr. Botchwey is a member of the Physical Activity Research Center (PARC) and directs the Built Environment and Public Health Clearinghouse. 

    She is co-author of Health Impact Assessment in the USA (2014), convener of a national expert panel on interdisciplinary workforce training between the public health and community design fields, and author of numerous articles, scientific presentations and workshops. Dr. Botchwey has won distinctions including an NSF ADVANCE Woman of Excellence Faculty Award, the Georgia Power Professor of Excellence Award, a Rockefeller-Penn Fellowship from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Nursing and a Nominated Changemaker by the Obama White House’ Council on Women and Girls. She has also served on the Advisory Committee to the Director for the Centers of Disease Control Prevention and the Voices for Healthy Kids Strategic Advisory Committee for the American Heart Association.

    Dr. Botchwey’s current focus is on youth advocacy for physical activity and community wellbeing.

    Areas of Discipline: Promoting physical activity; City planning; Youth advocacy; Health equity

    Rachel Millstein

    Clinical Psychologist

    General Hospital and Assistant Professor in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

    Dr. Rachel Millstein is a clinical psychologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Her research focuses on chronic disease prevention and the intersection of emotions and health. Her clinical interests include evidence-based therapies, positive psychology, and mindfulness techniques for improving mood, anxiety, and well-being.

    Dr. Millstein earned her PhD from her San Diego State University and completed a fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Kim Bryan

    Special Education Specialist,

    Glades Middle School, FL

    This session will offer the following credits:

         image

         0.1 IACET CEU


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements:

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "contents" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Speakers Disclosures:

    The opinions of the speakers in these events do not necessarily reflect the views of PlayCore and its brands.


    Notes:

    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/29/2021

    Plants increase community value in a number of ways beyond just their natural beauty. In this session, we’ll discover the many benefits that plants can provide communities, examine how a number of sites, from playgrounds to dog parks to bus shelters increased play and recreation value through the addition of key plants, and share tools to help parks, schools, and communities identify the unique benefits of a variety of plants to promote activity, imagination, sensory stimulation, and more. Attendees will come away with confidence on how to choose plants that will thrive in their region, and provide health, wellness, and recreation value for generations to come.

    Plants increase community value in a number of ways beyond just their natural beauty. In this session, we’ll discover the many benefits that plants can provide communities, examine how a number of sites, from playgrounds to dog parks to bus shelters increased play and recreation value through the addition of key plants, and share tools to help parks, schools, and communities identify the unique benefits of a variety of plants to promote activity, imagination, sensory stimulation, and more. Attendees will come away with confidence on how to choose plants that will thrive in their region, and provide health, wellness, and recreation value for generations to come.


    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify at least 10 benefits that exposure to nature can provide to enhance overall health and well-being.
    • Discover resources to augment public spaces with trees and plants for specific purposes like aroma, wildlife habitat, play opportunities, and more.
    • Understand the types of environments that can benefit from adding play and recreation value through plants.
    • Identify, curate, and print site specific lists of natural material to increase the health and wellness opportunities of public spaces.


    Anne-Marie Spencer

    Corporate Vice President of Marketing and Communications

    PlayCore

    Anne-Marie joined the PlayCore team in 2002, and is responsible for corporate marketing, communications and special project development for PlayCore, as well as serving as the company spokesperson and coordinator for all brand efforts, including advertising, promotion, trade show design, and external/internal communications. Anne-Marie is committed to building communities through play and recreation by motivating the marketing teams with creativity and encouragement, serving on the Board of Directors at the Chambliss Center for Children.


    Anne-Marie is a competitive obstacle course racer, and says “I love the variety, we carry and throw heavy objects, swing from our hands, throw spears, and scale high walls. It allows me to test my fitness and become a more well-rounded athlete and person.”

    Inés Palacios, PhD (Moderator)

    Training & Professional Development Manager

    PlayCore / CORE

    Inés is responsible for promoting the value of recreation for people of all ages and abilities. She provides continuing educational opportunities, professional development, and research that supports recreation and play while generating partnerships and alliances in the field. She joined the PlayCore team in August 2013 after obtaining her PhD in Parks, Recreation and Tourism from NC State University. Before joining PlayCore, she was an instructor at NC State University in the Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management Department. In addition, she has experience in event planning, program management, research, and national presentations. Inés is based out of Raleigh, NC.

    This session will offer the following credits:

         

    image


    0.1 IACET CEU
     


    CEUs for a total of 1 Professional Development Hours (0.1 IACET CEU) will be provided to learners meeting the following requirements: 

    • Be present for 95% of the duration of the learning event; 
    • Participate in activities and discussion throughout; 
    • Complete assessment with 80% mastery of learning outcome;
    • Complete feedback/evaluation survey


    To obtain your CEU, please visit the "contents" tab above to complete the associated components for this event.

    Instructor(s) Disclosures:

    The instructors of this training webinar are employed by PlayCore and disclose an interest in attendees partnering with PlayCore on their play and recreation initiatives.


    Notes:

    For any questions, please contact core@playcore.com